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Found 60 Collections

 

The Columbian Exchange

The term, The Columbian Exchange, refers to the widespread exchange of animals, plants, diseases, technology and ideas that occurred between Afro-Eurasia and the Americas after Christopher Columbus landed in the New World in 1492. The Columbus Exchange lasted throughout the years of expansion and discovery. During this time, we see a huge change in society. We see a change in American transportation, in agriculture, in the food we eat, in the clothing we wear, and as well as in architecture. 

Throughout this collection you will see the various of things that were traded between city and city and how they were important in the world at the time. You will also see that not only did The Columbian Exchange bring goods to the Old and New World, but it also brought diseases such as syphilis, small pox, and polio. 


Cierra Johnson
13
 

Culture of England

Objects that represent the way of life in England, some of their core values, and other aspects such as fashion and the origin of Shakespeare's Globe Theater. Although we associate England with the power they obtained over the colonies and other areas of the world after the Seven Years War there were many other factors that contributed to the culture of this country. Aside from their strong army that allowed them to conquer vast lands England gave way to many ideas, inventions and forms of art.

English citizens understood the importance of nature and animals and spent a generous amount of time outdoors. Many items that originated in England portray innocence and their connection with the universe.

Iyanna Ferguson
10
 

Documents and Photos of America before Civil War

My collection is a compilation of documents and photos of events happened in the United States History before the period of Civil War. Although not all of the items are made at the time before 1865, the content of these items represents the history figures and events of that time.

 The items are organized in chronological order. As you move through my collection, you will see pictures of Native American people with their interesting culture in dancing, hunting. Then there is an event I consider important in the U.S history, which is tobacco cultivation. This event leads to so much controversial history consequences. Then you will see a some funny pictures of daily life activities of American people in the 18th century: a dressing room, a letter, books about plants and animals discovered in America. The books contain beautiful pictures and detailed descriptions of the environment in the U.S in general. You will also see some silverware in the consumer revolution in the 18th century.

 I hope you enjoy my collection. I had a lot of fun doing the research. Some of the pictures remind me of the long and difficult process of development I hope you have the same experience and thank you for watching.


Quân Uông
11
 

"Blacks in the Westward Movement," "What Can You Do with a Portrait?" and "Of Beetles, Worms, and Leaves of Grass"

The premier (1976) issue of Art to Zoo contains three sections on three different subjects: the experiences of African Americans in westward expansion, the use of portrait art in the classroom, and the ordinary lawn as a habitat for plants and animals. Click the PDF icon to download the issue.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
7
 

A Mouse Like a House? A Pocket Elephant?

This 1987 issue of Art to Zoo engages students in a discussion of animal size and the importance of size in an animal’s life. It includes activities in which the students compare animal size differences, with a focus on metabolism and body temperature. Click the PDF icon to download the issue.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
9
 

Zika! Task 4-4 Identifying Local Disease Hosts

Use these supplemental resources to learn more about research being conducted on other animals which can be hosts for a variety of mosquito borne diseases. What animals live in your community that could be hosts for different diseases? Go outside and find out.

Andre Radloff
5
 

Communication

How do you communicate? Through words? Body language? A facial expression? Explore the different ways people and animals communicate.

Maureen Leary
8
 

Going...Going...Gone? Tropical Rainforests

Activities in this 1988 issue of Art to Zoo help students better understand the plant and animal life of rainforests. Click the PDF icon to download the issue.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
5
 

Water Animals: I See Wonder

I See Wonder is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use I See Wonder as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Share what you See. Awaken your Wonder.

Smithsonian Libraries
11
 

Animals | kindergarten

This collection connects with the Journeys reading series and is specific to the animals covered throughout the year.
Christina Ratatori
43
 

Early Man (Paleolithic to Neolithic)

I can describe characteristics and innovations of hunting and gathering societies such as nomadic lifestyles, inventors of tools, adaptation to animal migration and vegetation cycles and the shift from food gathering to food producing activities. 

Devin Mcgregor
58
 

World War II Propaganda

These pictures will be used to introduce a brief history of World War II before exploring communism with the novel Animal Farm. Students can either do one of the visual thinking strategies See / Think / Wonder or a Perceive / Know / Care About using the piece We Can Do It. The class can then proceed into the background overview of World War II.

As students read Animal Farm and study techniques of propaganda, students can then explore the other posters listed in this learning lab. They can first do the sorting activity to differentiate between the Soviet and American posters followed by the discussion about whether the posters more alike or more similar to each other. Connections to the novel can be made throughout this lesson.


Yolanda Toni
13
 

Structure & Function

Learn how animals have external structures that function to support survival and behavior.

SmithsonianScienceAshley
12
 

Access Series: Animals - Domestic and Wild!

This topical collection of artworks is all about animals—domestic pets, and wild, untamed beasts. Horses, elephants, dinosaurs, zebras, pandas...cats, hogs, frogs, dogs, lions, tigers, and bears; fish and fowl, monkeys that howl - you'll find all of them here. This collections was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials), and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, "Which animals have you seen before and where did you see them? If you could have any one of these animals as a pet, which would you choose and why?" Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.


Tags: Decision Making, Disabilities, Self-Determination, Self-Efficacy, Student Empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program

Debra Ray
278
 

How Can We Protect Animals When Their Habitat Changes

Smithsonian resources to be used in conjunction with the unit "How Can We Protect Animals When Their Habitat Changes?"

Sami Chiang
32
 

Activity Collection: 3D Modeling Bugs!

Go through the character sketches and renders from the animated feature "Bugs!" and guess what personalities the characters portray based on pose, shape, and expression. Then, using scientific illustrations from the National Museum of Natural History as reference, create your very own insect character in the Sculptris software.


This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

Cody Coltharp
20
 

Plants and Animals: Partners in Pollination

In this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom, students learn about the parts of flowers (and the parts of bees) and the symbiotic relationship behind pollination. Lesson plans introduce the role bees play in the production of many of our foods— including some surprising food!

Click on the PDF icon to download the issue.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
6
 

Senses Series - Smell

How do we experience the sense of smell? This collection explores the variety of human and animal smell experiences. Videos examine ants that use smell to communicate, orchid bee perfumery, and the unique smell adaptation of the maned wolf. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides the structure and function of the nose, as well as olfaction experiments. The collection concludes with a cross-cultural examination of touch from Tibetan monks' Buddhist perspective. How might their experience of touch differ from your own?

Tracie Spinale
9
 

Highlights Collection: Memorials History

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which may contain images, text, and other multimedia resources created to complement this Tween Tribune issue.. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection, visit the Learning Lab homepage (learninglab.si.edu) and sign up for a free account. This will allow you to copy the collection and adapt it for your own purposes. Learn more here: https://learninglab.si.edu/create

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
30
 

3rd Grade- Culture

Themes: culture, ethnicity, holidays, celebrations, animal vessels, still life (especially table settings)

Ancient Cultures: Egypt, China, Greece, Rome, Mali

ladyinn
69
 

2nd Grade- Community & Habitat

Themes: communities, habitats, economics (goods, services, interdependence, producer, consumer), Native Americans culture, explorers, overlapping, multiple ground lines, various sky colors

Animals live in habitats; people live in communities.

ladyinn
44
 

Senses Series - Sight in Humans and Animals

How do we see what we see? This collection is about seeing the world in unexpected ways through human innovations and animal adaptations. Meet a teen who invented a new way to see infrared, a visually impaired woman with a bionic implant, a shark whose eye is similar our own, a Giant Squid with the world's largest eyes, a mantis shrimp who sees many colors in all directions, and a nocturnal sweat bee who navigates the jungle in the dark. Learn about why human vision can only see a certain type of light within the electromagnetic spectrum. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides an overview of how the eye and brain function together, and experiments to try.

Tracie Spinale
14
 

Senses Series - Hearing

How do we hear what we hear? This collection is about hearing the world in unexpected ways through human perspectives of science and culture, and animal adaptations. Meet a shark whose entire body is an ear; zoo otters who play the keyboard; rabbits whose large ear adaptations provide self-defense; and the reasons for a sea lion's bark. Learn about the structure and function of human ears can only see a certain type of light within the electromagnetic spectrum. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides an overview of how the ear and hearing functions work, as well as a sound experiments to try. The collections closes with a cross-cultural examination of hearing and function from Tibetan monks.

Tracie Spinale
10
 

Senses Series - Touch

How do we experience the sense of touch? This collection explores the variety of human and animal touch experiences. From the characteristics of a variety of objects, to a video which examines the touch experience of tortoises and pandas... we all experience touch differently. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides touch experiments; an examination of pain and why it hurts, and the functionality of the body's largest organ—the skin. The collection concludes with a cross-cultural examination of touch from Tibetan monks' Buddhist perspective. How might their experience of touch differ from your own?

Tracie Spinale
20
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