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Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Table Mountain, CA

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Solar observation Instruments outside the entrance to the instrument tunnel at the solar observing station of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory at Table Mountain, California.

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Testing at Camp Lee, Virginia

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory conducted tests on the effects of the sun on fabrics during World War II at Camp Lee, Virginia.

Camera Used by Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Location of the photograph is unknown, but it is possibly taken in Pasadena, California.

A Baker-Nunn Schmidt camera used by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory to observe and photograph stars and satellites. A man, likely Karl Henize, stands beside the camera gazing skyward and another man stands to the right at an instrument panel.

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Employees

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Group photograph of Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory employees, including Florence Meier Chase, fifth Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution (1928-1944) Charles Greeley Abbot (second from the left), M. Agnes Neill, Earl S. Johnston, Robert Weintraub, Anne Lucka, William Hoover, Edward D. McAlister, and unidentified others. While these individuals are named, it is not clear as to where they are standing in the photograph.

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, South Yard

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
View of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in the South Yard with the Smithsonian Institution Building in the background.

SAO Buildings at Mt. Montezuma, Chile

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For more photos of Mt. Montezuma Chile, see 7005/187/9. Also # 3766-B. This picture featured in the ANNUALS, vol. 7

Garage and shop are located in the foreground with seismograph and computing room on the right at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) station at Mount Montezuma, Chile.

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in the South Yard

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Buildings in the South Yard behind the Smithsonian Institution Building, include a building located on the southeast built for use by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, established on March 1, 1890. The United States Department of Agriculture Building is in the background.

Flag Designed for the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Smithson Bicentennial

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The first Smithsonian flag was designed in 1955.

Bureau flags were designed for all the Smithsonian bureaus for the celebration of the bicentennial of James Smithson's birth. The thirteen individual banners were all similar except for the design of the canton in the upper left corner. All have a blue field with gold fringe on the upper, lower, and right sides. In the center is a gold sun burst with sixteen alternating straight and wavy rays representing the "increase and diffusion of knowledge." The canton for the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory flag is black with a a dark blue circle featuring three stars and a comet.

Solar Observation Station at Mt. Montezuma, Chile

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
At the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory at Mt. Montezuma, Chile, cave observatory and solar observation instruments are used in the study of the sun. A man using a solar observation instrument stands outside the cave.

Whipple Observatory Volunteers

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in Torch, January 1990 Supplement

In Arizona, Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory volunteers pose with symbols of their expertise. From left to right, John Kuntz grips a sledge hammer, Bob McDaniel steadies a vernier height gauge, and Shirley Spanner holds a rescued rainbow cactus. John Kuntz, a tour guide for the Observatory, has added the task of road-marker to his repertoire. Kuntz marked a 10-mile stretch of the road from the new Base Camp to the top of the mountain at 100 foot intervals for future road contractors. Bob McDaniel, a former machinist, has fashioned arcane bits and pieces of hardware for Whipple telescopes. Shirley Spanner, at the site of the Observatory's new Base Camp in the foothills of the Santa Rita Mountains, rescued a number of uncommon cactuses from the bulldozer's blade.

Narrow Dirt Road to Whipple Observatory

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in TORCH, January 1985

A winding, single-lane, dirt road 18 miles long connects the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Whipple Observatory atop Mount Hopkins in Arizona with the outside world. In 1984, a 1.5-mile section of the road at the very top, between the 8,550-foot summit and the 7,600-foot ridge was paved.

Multiple Mirror Telescope Construction

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in the Torch, February 1978

Construction of the optical support system that will hold the six large reflecting mirrors and other associated optics of the Multiple Mirror Telescope at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory atop of Mt. Hopkins, Arizona, mid-September 1977. The MMT is a joint project of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the University of Arizona.

Temporary River Crossing at Mount Hopkins

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in TORCH, December 1984

It's been rough going for staff and others trying to commute to the mountaintop facility at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in Arizona. The temporary river crossing connecting the Amado, Arizona, base camp of the SAO Whipple Observatory with its telescope facilities atop the mountain have been wiped out eight times in less than a year. The photograph was taken in October 1984 and shows a jeep and collapsed bridge.

SAO Buildings at Mt. Montezuma, Chile

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Observers' quarters at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Mt. Montezuma, Chile. Beyond the plain building is two peaks. A car and a truck are to the right of the building next to some lumber. A dog is standing on the left side of the photograph.

Plan of the Astrophysical Observatory

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Cross-section plan entitled "Longitudinal-Section Plan of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory."

Observatory at Mt. Montezuma, Chile

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For more photos of Mt. Montezuma, Chile, see 7005/187/5

Observer's quarters, foreground, and observatory at top of peak at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Solar Observing Station, Mt. Montezuma, Chile.

Installation of Multiple Mirror Telescope

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in the Torch, June 1978

Looking down on six primary optics, the heart of the Multiple Mirror Telescope, while they are being uncrated inside the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory building located on top of Mt. Hopkins, Arizona.

Installation of Multiple Mirror Telescope

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in the Torch, June 1978

Building contractors install special insulated panels around the Multiple Mirror Telescope's observing chamber at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory building located on top of Mt. Hopkins, Arizona.

Observatory on Mount St. Katherine, Egypt

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
There are similar pictures in Record Unit 7005, Box168, Folder 5. #31226-N is crisper. Also try 31226-B.

A solar observing station of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory located at Mount St. Katherine, Egypt, from 1933 to 1937. This view shows the observatory (top) and living quarters (below) at the site. A trail can be seen on the left leading to the observatory.

Shah of Iran Visits Smithsonian Station in Shiraz, Iran

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The operation of the Baker-Nunn camera, located at the Smithsonian Station in Shiraz, Iran, is explained to Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, Shah of Iran, on April 26, 1959. In 1966, the station was moved to Debre Zeit, Ethiopia.

Corbitt, Whipple & Udall at Mt. Hopkins Observatory

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Of a series featured in TORCH, May 1974 (in TORCH May 1974 folder, but not the newspaper). See also TORCH, August, 1968. For an amusing story about the gamma-ray collector, see TORCH, May 1974

(Left to right) Tucson mayor James Corbitt, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Director Dr. Fred Whipple (1955-1973) and Rep. Morris K. Udall (D-AZ) stand in front of a 34-foot gamma-ray collector at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Mt. Hopkins, Arizona, October 23, 1968. The large surface light collector, really a mosaic of 252 polished glass mirrors, searches for sources of gamma-ray radiation in the heavens, a feat never attempted before from a ground-based observatory.

SAO Slide-rule Machine

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In the ANNALS, vol. 6

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory Slide-rule machine, c. 1931-1949.

Smithsonian Solar Observing Station, Table Mountain, CA

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Original negative number is MAH-33666.

Solar observation instrument stands outside the entrance to the observing tunnel used for the daily measurement of the sun's radiation at the solar observing station at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Table Mountain, California.

Observing Station in Peru

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The Smithsonian camera station in Arequipa, Peru. The large structure in the foreground is the Administrative Building, housing offices, photo labs, and electronic equipment. The long building directly behind it is the Camera House with a movable roof which slides away whenever the camera is in use. The tracks on the roof extend to the right of the Camera House.
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