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Braising Questions

Smithsonian Magazine

Any Questions?

Smithsonian American Art Museum
William King's Any Questions? is both humorous and disturbing. This nearly eight-foot-tall duck dressed in a business suit stands confidently with his hands on his hips as he ominously smiles down at those who would dare ask him a question. The sculpture satirizes the American business community for falsely encouraging a level of communication between employees and their superiors. King suggests that bosses, like this one, encourage subordinates to offer their opinions, only to ignore them. He dressed the bare metal armature in shiny white vinyl to show that the boss is nothing more than an "empty suit."

"If you dont feel like making sculpture, don't; but if you do, be ruthless." William King, quoted in Talese, "Sculptor finds Fourth-Graders Outspoken Critics of His Work," New York Times, March 20, 1962

Questioning Moment

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Q?rius - Question Everything - Now Open

National Museum of Natural History
UNLOCK YOUR WORLD. Introducing Q?rius from the Smithsonian. A new place where you can do more than you thought possible, and see more than you ever imagined. Explore real objects with actual scientific equipment. Rub elbows with museum experts. Find new interests. And be yourself -- in a place that gets what it means to be a teen. Only at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History.

Gold (Questionable) Ornament

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Gold (Questionable) Ornament

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Questions About Apollo

Smithsonian Magazine

Well Formed Questions.../

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Questions (Series 7)

National Anthropological Archives
No data is included.

Two Great Questions

National Portrait Gallery

Popping the Question

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Sentimental genre prints documented the social image of Victorian virtue through domestic scenes of courtship, family, home life, and images of the “genteel female.” Children are depicted studying nature or caring for their obedient pets as they learn their place in the greater world. Romantic scenes picture devoted husbands with their contented, dutiful wives. In these prints, young women educated in reading, music, needlework, the arts, the language of flowers, basic math and science are subjugated to their family’s needs.

These prints became popular as lithography was introduced to 19th Century Americans. As a new art form, it was affordable for the masses and provided a means to share visual information by crossing the barriers of race, class and language. Sentimental prints encouraged the artistic endeavors of schoolgirls and promoted the ambitions of amateur artists, while serving as both moral instruction and home or business decoration. They are a pictorial record of our romanticized past.

This colored print is a three-quarter length portrait of man and woman seated indoors. The woman is finely dressed in a long dress with lace trim, gloves, and a jewel on her forehead. The gentleman wears a dress coat and plaid trousers. He appears to be pondering how best to ask marriage. Room furnishings include: an ornate table and side chairs,an open jewelry box and vase on a table and a guitar under table. Fancy lace curtains, draperies, and a carved mirror decorate the room.

The print was produced by Sarony & Major. Napoleon Sarony (1821–1896) was born in Quebec, Canada and trained under several lithography firms including Currier & Ives and H.R. Robinson. Sarony was also known for his successful experiments in early photography, eventually developing a cabinet-sized camera. In 1846, Sarony partnered with another former apprentice of Nathaniel Currier, Henry B. Major and created Sarony & Major Lithography firm. Joseph F. Knapp joined the firm in 1857. Sarony, Major & Knapp earned a solid reputation for lithography and the company was especially known for its fine art chromolithography. Unfortunately, by the 1870s, the firm shifted focus to the more profitable area of advertising. It also expanded to become the conglomerate known as the American Lithographic Company, successfully producing calendars, advertising cards and posters. In 1930 they were bought out by Consolidated Graphics.

AID2 question #4

National Museum of African Art

4 Questions 4: Matt Webb

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
A quick interview with Matt Webb, CEO & Principal at BERG, a London Design Consultancy. BERG might be best-known for its new product, "Little Printer," a compact and charming device that has garnered plenty of buzz in recent months in the tech & design world. In this interview, Matt talks about his life path, the tricky question of defining design, and the future of personal computing.

4 Questions 4: Kevin Palmer

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Kevin Palmer, founding partner of Kin Design, recently stopped by Cooper-Hewitt for a chat. Seated in the beautiful North Reading Room of the National Design Library, we asked him four questions about starting his business, designing for the museum context, and a new definition of craftsmanship for digital designs.

4 Questions 4: Anab Jain

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Anab Jain, founding partner of Superflux, discusses the influence of fantastical beliefs on her work, the structure of her business, and the designer's shifting role in 21st century "architectures of collaboration."

Three Questions On Death

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Poster for Eunme Ahn’s performance, Three Questions On Death at the Gwangju: Ha Jung-Woong Art Hall, Gwangju National University of Education, 2014, part of the Asian Arts Theatre’s Community Performativity 2014 program. Purple text in English and Hangul is outlined in white against turquoise and coral clouds against a purple background. The English reads "Eunme Ahn" and "Three / Questions / on Death."

Hong Kong: 1997 Question

National Portrait Gallery

Q?rius - Question Everything - Discover More

National Museum of Natural History
UNLOCK YOUR WORLD. Introducing Q?rius from the Smithsonian. A new place where you can do more than you thought possible, and see more than you ever imagined. Explore real objects with actual scientific equipment. Rub elbows with museum experts. Find new interests. And be yourself -- in a place that gets what it means to be a teen. Only at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History.

A Question of Guilt

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Illustrated depiction of a woman's face at left and man's face at upper right, with cobblestone road in background. Text presented in grid-like arrangement. Above, in black on white and red/blue on black: A QUESTION OF GUILT; lower right, in black on white: "FRANCES FYEFELD NOW JOINS THAT CHARMED CIRCLE of murderous British females, from Sayers and Christie to Ruth Rendell and P.D. James..." Michael Milano; in white on black: A NOVEL BY; in black on yellow; FRANCES FYFIELD.

Question & Answer Card Game

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
This question and answer card game was owned by the Copp family of Stonington, Connecticut during the 19th century. During the 1800s, parlor games were a popular way to pass the time for young and old, but this game was geared towards a younger audience. The cards with red text were given to women, while the cards with black text were given to men. The cards could be matched to lead to a humorous exchange, or allow for a flirtatious answer to a romantic question.

The Copp Collection contains a variety of household objects that the Copp family of Connecticut used from around 1700 until the mid-1800s. Part of the Puritan Great Migration from England to Boston, the family eventually made their home in New London County, Connecticut, where their textiles, clothes, utensils, ceramics, books, bibles, and letters provide a vivid picture of daily life. More of the collection from the Division of Home and Community Life can be viewed by searching accession number 28810.

Question & Answer Card Game

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
This question and answer card game was owned by the Copp family of Stonington, Connecticut during the 19th century. During the 1800s, parlor games were a popular way to pass the time for young and old, but this game was geared towards a younger audience. The cards with red text were given to women, while the cards with black text were given to men. The cards could be matched to lead to a humorous exchange, or allow for a flirtatious answer to a romantic question.

The Copp Collection contains a variety of household objects that the Copp family of Connecticut used from around 1700 until the mid-1800s. Part of the Puritan Great Migration from England to Boston, the family eventually made their home in New London County, Connecticut, where their textiles, clothes, utensils, ceramics, books, bibles, and letters provide a vivid picture of daily life. More of the collection from the Division of Home and Community Life can be viewed by searching accession number 28810.

Disentanglement Puzzle, Question Puzzle

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
This disentanglement puzzle consists of two metal pieces bent so that there are arcs of circles at both ends of each piece. The pieces come apart. Both A. C. Gilbert and Sherm's, Inc., sold this as the question puzzle. Compare MA.335929, MA.335360, and one puzzle of MA.335288. References: A.C. Gilbert Company, Book of Instructions for Use with Gilbert Puzzle Parties. . . ., New Haven: A.C. Gilbert Company, 1920, p. 4. A copy of this booklet is online at gamearchives.org, accessed July 26, 2017. Jerry Slocum and Jack Botermans, Puzzles Old & New: How to Make and Solve Them, Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1986, esp. pp. 96-97.

AID2 Question #2: Min. Alexandre Porto - Minister

National Museum of African Art
Min. Alexandre Porto - Minister for the Brazilian Embassy in Washington, DC asks the artists his question.

AID2 question #1: Darias Jonker

National Museum of African Art
the Second Secretary for the South African Embassy asks the Sandile and Henrique a few questions.
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