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Native Peoples and Genetic Research 04: Dr. David Wilson

National Museum of the American Indian
Dr. David Wilson (Diné), Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native American Scientists, provides some introductory comments for the first panel of the symposium on the topic "Can Genetics Research Improve Native Health?" "A Spectrum of Perspectives: Native Peoples and Genetic Research" was recorded at the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 23, 2014.

Living Earth Festival Native Chef Cooking Competition

National Museum of the American Indian
This is NMAI's iconic timed cooking competition. This year Chef Don McClellan (Cherokee), an Executive Chef with Cherokee Nation Entertainment in northeastern Oklahoma, competes against Chef Freddie Bitsoie (Navajo) as they face off to prepare appetizers, entrees, and desserts that incorporate fresh, local meats and vegetables and a special ingredient native to North America, blueberries. NMAI Assistant Director, Carolyn McClellan, emcees the proceedings. The competition was live webcast from the Welcome Plaza of the National Museum of the American Indian on July 21, 2013.

The National Native American Veterans Memorial Consultation

National Museum of the American Indian
The National Museum of the American Indian has been authorized by Congress to create a memorial honoring the service of Native Americans in the armed forces of the United States. In this special presentation, Kevin Gover (Pawnee), Director of the National Museum of the American Indian, presents details regarding the planning for this important veterans memorial that will be built on the grounds of the museum in 2020. Herman J. Viola, curator emeritus at the Smithsonian Institution and author of Warriors in Uniform, the Legacy of American Indian Heroism, also speaks on the importance of a Native American Veterans Memorial. The museum is seeking comments from Native Americans on this project. This presentation was recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D. C. on May 25, 2017.

Living Earth Festival: Native Chef Cook-off Competition

National Museum of the American Indian
The Native Chef Cook-off Competition has become a signature event in the museum's annual Living Earth Festival. This year, Oneida chef Arlie Doxtator will competes in this Iron Chef-style competition against Oaxacan chef Neftali Duran in preparing two appetizers, entrees and desserts that incorporate cranberries, a fruit indigenous to North America. Mitsitam Cafe chef Jerome Grant emcees the event, and three local chefs serve as judges: Chef Sue McWilliams, Culinary instructor at Paint Branch High School Culinary Arts Program; Chef Brian Patterson, instructor, L’Academie de Cuisine; and Chef Pedro Matamoros from The Golden Flame Restaurant, Silver Spring, MD. This event was webcast from the Welcome Plaza of the National Museum of the American Indian on July 20, 2014.

To Fish Or Not To Fish?-A Salmon River Native Film Project - Salmon River School District

National Museum of the American Indian
Students explore fishing and the impact PCB's have on the health and well-being of people in the Akwasasne community.

Native Peoples and Genetic Research 13: Panel 2 Q and A

National Museum of the American Indian
Dr. Rosita Worl (Tlingit), Sealaska Heritage Institute, Dr. Shane Doyle (Crow Nation), Montana State University, and Dr. Sarah Anzick, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, National Institutes of Health, return to the stage to engage the audience in a Question and Answer session on the second panel topic, "Genomics & Ancestry: Ethics, Origins, and Policy." "A Spectrum of Perspectives: Native Peoples and Genetic Research" was recorded at the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 23, 2014.

Native Chilean Women: (Bilingual) The Role of Women in the Preservation of Indigenous Culture...

National Museum of the American Indian
In this bilingual version of the panel, Native Chilean Women: Challenges and Opportunities - The Role of Women in the Preservation of Indigenous Culture and Language, María Francisca Collipal (Mapuche), Anakena Manutomatoma (Rapanui), and Sonia Avalos (Quechua) and Daniel Cano, PhD. candidate at Georgetown University share their insights and experiences—giving examples of their everyday life and work, and relating the issues at hand directly to their Native group—at this lively forum. Followed by a Q & A session. Cosponsored by the Embassy of Chile and Freedom House. Presented as part of the KARUKINKA Chilean Patagonia Artists of the Land Where the Trees Talk.

Native Chilean Women: (English) The Role of Women in the Preservation of Indigenous Culture...

National Museum of the American Indian
This version of the panel, Native Chilean Women: Challenges and Opportunities - The Role of Women in the Preservation of Indigenous Culture and Language, provides simultaneous English translation of the Spanish-speaking panelists. Speakers include: María Francisca Collipal (Mapuche), Anakena Manutomatoma (Rapanui), and Sonia Avalos (Quechua) and Daniel Cano, PhD. candidate at Georgetown University. Panelists share their insights and experiences—giving examples of their everyday life and work, and relating the issues at hand directly to their Native group—at this lively forum. Followed by a Q & A session. Cosponsored by the Embassy of Chile and Freedom House. Presented as part of the KARUKINKA Chilean Patagonia Artists of the Land Where the Trees Talk.

Native Chilean Women: (Bilingual) Empowering Indigenous Women and Their Communities

National Museum of the American Indian
In this bilingual version of the panel, Native Chilean Women: Challenges and Opportunities - Empowering Indigenous Women and Their Communities, we hear of challenges met by several indigenous groups in Chile. Speakers include: María Francisca Collipal (Mapuche), Anakena Manutomatoma (Rapanui), and Sonia Avalos (Quechua) and Jacqueline Pata (Tlingit). Panelists will share their insights and experiences—giving examples of their everyday life and work, and relating the issues at hand directly to their Native group—at this lively forum. Followed by a Q & A session. Cosponsored by the Embassy of Chile and Freedom House. Presented as part of the KARUKINKA Chilean Patagonia Artists of the Land Where the Trees Talk.

Art Talk 2016

National Museum of the American Indian
Unique Art Forms in Native American Design with Tonya June Rafael & Peter Boome. Moderated by Emil Her Many Horses.

Totem Pole spot

National Museum of the American Indian

Power of Chocolate: Food Demonstration and Discussion II

National Museum of the American Indian
Mitsitam Native Foods Cafe Chef Richard Hetzler demonstrates cooking techniques employing chocolate in several dishes. This demonstration features completely different dishes from the first demonstration. From Power of Chocolate festival at the National Museum of the American Indian on February 12, 2012.

Code Talker Induction into NSA Hall of Honor

National Museum of the American Indian
The National Museum of the American Indian and the National Security Agency join together for a special presentation and reception celebrating the induction of the Native American Code Talkers into the National Security Agency Hall of Honor. The induction of Native American Code Talkers into the NSA/CSS Cryptologic Hall of Honor is intended to remember all code talkers, known and unknown. Speakers include NMAI director, Kevin Gover (Pawnee) and NSA deputy chief of staff Trumbull D. Soule.

Native/American Fashion 12 | Problematics of Cultural Appropriation Q&A

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, speakers from the second panel, Problematics of Cultural Appropriation in Contemporary Fashion, return to the stage to take questions from the audience. The panel is moderated by Kathleen Ash-Milby of the National Museum of the American Indian. Panelists include Adrienne Keene of Brown University, Joe Horse Capture of the Minnesota Historical Society, writer, editor, and creative consultant Lynette Nylander, and Susan Scafidi of the Fashion Law Institute at Fordham Law School. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Inka Road Symposium 04 - Greetings from the Andes

National Museum of the American Indian
This special symposium celebrates the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian’s landmark exhibition, The Great Inka Road: Engineering an Empire, with a fascinating look at the material, political, economic, and religious structures that integrated more than one hundred Native nations and millions of people in the powerful Andean Empire known as the Tawantinsuyu. In this segment, Peruvian Ambassador to the U.S., Luis Miguel Castilla, offers greetings from the Andes. The symposium was recorded at the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 25-26, 2015.

John Haworth Thank You

National Museum of the American Indian
Thank you to everyone who has voted for the National Museum of the American Indian in the Partners in Preservation campaign. Vote daily through May 21 at /www.partnersinpreservation.com

Hawaii Festival 2016 - Storyteller Missy Mokihana Scalph

National Museum of the American Indian
Missy Mokihana Scalph tells a traditional Hawaiian story and gives some hula lessons in the Imaginations Activity Center. This performance was webcast and recorded in the imagiNATIONS Activity Center of the National Museum of the American Indian on May 28, 2016.

Native/American Fashion 17 | Creative Collaborations Q&A

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, speakers from the third panel, Creative Collaborations, return to the stage to take questions from the audience. The panel is moderated by Eileen Karp of the Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York. Panelists include founder and owner of Beyond Buckskin Jessica Metcalfe and artist/designers Virgil Ortiz and Douglas Miles. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Native/American Fashion 4 | Timothy Shannon

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the second panelist to speak on the topic Mobility and Cultural Identity Through Fashion, Timothy Shannon of Gettysburg College. His talk is titled Clothes along the Mohawk: Fashion, Exchange, and Appropriation among the Peoples of Early New York. Timothy J. Shannon is a professor and chair of the History Department at Gettysburg College, where he teaches early American and Native American history. His books include Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier (Penguin, 2008) and Indians and Colonists at the Crossroads of Empire: The Albany Congress of 1754 (Cornell, 2000), which won the Dixon Ryan Fox Prize from the New York State Historical Association and the Distinguished Book Award from the Society of Colonial Wars. His book Indian Captive, Indian King: Peter Williamson in America and Britain will be published by Harvard University Press in fall 2017. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Protecting Black Ash Trees for Future Generations - Salmon River School District

National Museum of the American Indian
Students from the Salmon River School District look at how baskets are made and how important they are to their culture.

Touch My Tears: A Choctaw Storytelling Concert

National Museum of the American Indian
Author and storyteller Sarah Elisabeth Sawyer (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma) of the museum's Artist Leadership Program as she presents tales from the past and present to entertain the audience and share the unique culture of the Choctaw people.

Solar Panel Service Project - Bug O Nay Ge Shig School

National Museum of the American Indian
Students at the Bug-O-Nay-Ge-Shig School examine how solar panels can be used for alternative methods.

Touch My Tears: A Choctaw Storytelling Concert

National Museum of the American Indian
Author and storyteller Sarah Elisabeth Sawyer (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma) of the museum's Artist Leadership Program presents tales from the past and present to entertain the audience and share the unique culture of the Choctaw people.

He Lani Ko Luna (In losing the sight of land, you discover the stars): A Sky Above

National Museum of the American Indian
Chad Kālepa Baybayan presents the history of deep sea voyaging and exploration, as well as the indigenous Polynesian system of ocean navigation and the efforts to revitalize a once dynamic maritime culture through education from a Native worldview. Recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on May 25, 2013.
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