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sound recording: Method Man Sampler CD

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Various Artists. METHOD MAN SAMPLER CD (Def Jam (A)-566 471-2)

Multi-color printed cardboard sleeve with cd.

sound recording: Method Man Sampler Tape

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Various Artists. METHOD MAN SAMPLER TAPE (Def Jam DEF-191-4/2)

Multi-color printed box with cassette.

Cladistic methods

Smithsonian Libraries

Introduction and Methods

Smithsonian Libraries

Part 2: Updated Methods for Digitization of Daguerreotypes

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
A video presentation from the Daguerreian Society Symposium in November 2012 covering imaging techniques for documenting daguerreotypes. Part 2 includes DSLR photography, the DagHaus, high dynamic range imaging (HDRI), axial specular illumination and reflectance transformation imaging (RTI).

Part 1: Updated Methods for Digitization of Daguerreotypes

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
A video presentation from the Daguerreian Society Symposium in November 2012 covering imaging techniques for documenting daguerreotypes. Part 1 includes an introduction to the presentation and imaging team, an overview of imaging techniques, and presents scanning as an imaging technique.

The ethics of lethal methods

Smithsonian Libraries

The methods of fire-making

Smithsonian Libraries

Research Methods and Surprising Findings

National Museum of Natural History
Martin Storksdieck is Director of the Board on Science Eduaction at the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council where he oversees studies that address a wide range of issues related to science education. He is also a research fellow at the Institute for Learning Innovation, involved in a variety of research studies on informal science learning. Martin is interested in factors that influence scientific and technical literacy, particularly the role of lifelong learning within the ecology of learning opportunities. Another focus of Martin's interest is the intersection of science, society and learning, primarily as those relate to the understanding of evolution and environmental change.

Rabies Vaccine - Semple Method

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Part 3: Updated Methods for Digitization of Daguerreotypes

Smithsonian Museum Conservation Institute
A video presentation from the Daguerreian Society Symposium in November 2012 covering imaging techniques for documenting daguerreotypes. Part 3 includes gigapixel imaging, multispectral and hyperspectral imaging and concludes the presentation.

sound recording: Speak French - Brochès Method

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
SPEAK FRENCH - BROCHÈS METHOD (parts 1 and 2). (Brochephone), with booklet.

sound recording: Speak French - Brochès Method

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
SPEAK FRENCH - BROCHÈS METHOD (parts 3 and 4). (Brochephone), with booklet.

Method of using baren i

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Drawing which demonstrates method of using a baren in Japanese woodcut printing. Published in Tokuno essay on Japanese woodcutting and wood-cut printing, edited by S. R. Koehler for SI Annual Report for 1892.

Method of using baren ii

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Drawing which demonstrates the method of using a baren in Japanese woodcut printing. Published in Tokuno essay on Japanese woodcutting and wood-cut printing, edited by S. R. Koehler for SI Annual Report for 1892.

Anna Krylov, "Complex-scaled equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method with...

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
Anna Krylov , University of Southern CA., during the workshop of "Theory of Electron-Molecule Collisions for Astrophysics, Biophysics and Low-Temperature Plasmas: Opportunities and Challenges", lecture titled "Complex-scaled equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method with single and double substitutions for autoionizing excited states: Theory, implementation, and examples" , at the Institute for Theoretical, Atomic and Molecular and Optical Physics, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts on December 3-5, 2012. © Harvard University and Anna Krylov. The text and images on ITAMP's YouTube channel are intended for public access and educational use. This material is owned or held by the President and Fellows of Harvard College. It is being provided solely for the purpose of teaching or individual research or enrichment. Any other use, including commercial reuse, mounting on other systems, or other forms of redistribution requires permission. ITAMP is supported through grants by the National Science Foundation Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s).

Methodism Centenary Children’s Medal

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
The Scovill Manufacturing Company of Waterbury, Connecticut produced this commemorative medal during the late 19th century. Scovill was established in 1802 as a button manufacturer that is still in business today. Scovill is an important example of early American industrial manufacturing that adapted armory machines to mass-produce a variety of consumer goods including buttons, daguerreotype mats, and medals.

Obverse: Bust of Francis Asbury facing forward. The legend reads: CENTENARY OF AMERICAN METHODISM./ 1866/ FRANCIS ASBURY.

Reverse: Wreath around the center. The legend reads: SUFFER THE LITTLE CHILDREN TO COME UNTO ME/ CHILDREN'S MEDAL.

"American Method in Astronomical Observation"

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
From its infancy, timekeeping has depended on astronomy. The motion of celestial bodies relative to the rotating Earth provided the most precise measure of time until the mid-twentieth century, when quartz and atomic clocks proved more constant. Until that time, mechanical observatory clocks were set and continuously corrected to agree with astronomical observations.

The application of electricity to observatory timepieces in the late 1840s revolutionized the way American astronomers noted the exact movement of celestial events. U.S. Coast Survey teams devised a method to telegraph clock beats, both within an observatory and over long distances, and to record both the beats and the moment of observation simultaneously. British astronomers dubbed it the "American method of astronomical observation" and promptly adopted it themselves.

Transmitting clock beats by telegraph not only provided astronomers with a means of recording the exact moment of astronomical observations but also gave surveyors a means of determining longitude. Because the Earth rotates on its axis every twenty-four hours, longitude and time are equivalent (fifteen degrees of longitude equals one hour).

In 1849 William Cranch Bond, then director of the Harvard College Observatory, devised an important improvement for clocks employed in the "American method." He constructed several versions of break-circuit devices—electrical contracts and insulators attached to the mechanical clock movement—for telegraphing clock beats once a second. The Bond regulator shown here incorporates such a device. Bond's son Richard designed the accompanying drum chronograph, an instrument that touched a pen to a paper-wrapped cylinder to record both the beats of the clock and the instant of a celestial event, signaled when an observer pressed a telegraph key.
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