Skip to Content

Found 104 Resources

Smithsonian Institution fiscal year ... justification of estimates of appropriations to the Bureau of the Budget

Smithsonian Libraries
Description based on: Fiscal year 1970 (published [Sept. 30, 1968]).

Supplement for fiscal year 1972: Program for natural history research for the 1970's.

Supplements for fiscal years 1973-1986: Museum programs and related research (special foreign currency program)

Stored in the Smithsonian Institution's Office of Planning, Management, and Budget.

Smithsonian Institution budget justifications for the fiscal year ... submitted to the Committees on Appropriations, Congress of the United States

Smithsonian Libraries
Description based on: Fiscal year 1971 (published Jan. 1970).

Budget justifications stored in the Smithsonian Institution's Office of Planning, Management, and Budget.

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars fiscal year ... justification of estimates of appropriations to the Bureau of the Budget

Smithsonian Libraries
Description based on: Fiscal year 1971.

Budget justifications stored in the Smithsonian Institution's Office of Planning, Management, and Budget.

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars budget justifications for the fiscal year ... submitted to the Committees on Appropriations, Congress of the United States

Smithsonian Libraries
Description based on: Fiscal year 1972 (published: Jan. 1971).

Budget justifications stored in the Smithsonian Institution's Office of Planning, Management, and Budget.

What Makes You Say That?: Project Zero Visible Thinking Routine

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
A "Visible Thinking" routine for interpretation with justification from Project Zero. This routine helps students describe what they see or know and asks them to build explanations. It promotes evidential reasoning (evidence-based reasoning) and because it invites students to share their interpretations, it encourages students to understand alternatives and multiple perspectives. Asks the questions, "What's going on?" and "What do you see that makes you say that?" WHAT MAKES YOU SAY THAT?

Interpretation with justification routine

1. What's going on?

2. What do you see that makes you say that?

Purpose: What kind of thinking does this routine encourage?

This routine helps students describe what they see or know and asks them to build explanations. It promotes evidential reasoning (evidence-based reasoning) and

because it invites students to share their interpretations, it encourages students to understand alternatives and multiple perspectives.

Application: When and where can it be used?

This is a thinking routine that asks students to describe something, such as an object or concept, and then support their interpretation with evidence. Because the basic questions in this routine are flexible, it is useful when looking at objects such as works of art or historical artifacts, but it can also be used to explore a poem, make scientific observations and hypothesis, or investigate more conceptual ideas (i.e., democracy). The routine can be adapted for use with almost any subject and may also be useful for gathering information on students' general concepts when introducing a new topic.

Launch: What are some tips for starting and using this routine?

In most cases, the routine takes the shape of a whole class or group conversation around an object or topic, but can also be used in small groups or by individuals. When first introducing the routine, the teacher may scaffold students by continually asking the follow-up questions after a student gives an interpretation. Over time students may begin to automatically support their interpretations with evidence with out even being asked, and eventually students will begin to internalize the routine.

The two core questions for this routine can be varied in a number of ways depending on the context:

What do you know? What do you see or know that makes you say that? Sometimes you may want to preceded students' interpretation by using a question of description: What do you see? or What do you know?

When using this routine in a group conversation it may be necessary to think of alternative forms of documentation that do not interfere with the flow of the discussion. One option is to record class discussions using video or audio. Listening and noting students' use of language of thinking can help you see their development. Students words and language can serve as a form of documentation that helps create a rubric for what makes a good interpretation or for what constitutes good reasoning.

Another option is to make a chart or keep an ongoing list of explanations posted in the classroom. As interpretations develop, note changes and have further discussion about these new explanations. These lists can also invite further inquiry and searches for evidence. Other options for both group and individual work include students documenting their own interpretations through sketches, drawings, models and writing, all of which can be displayed and revisited in the classroom."

Think Pair Share Routine: Project Zero Visible Thinking Routine

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
A "Visible Thinking" routine for active reasoning and explanation from Project Zero. It encourages students to think about something, such as a problem, question or topic, and then articulate their thoughts. Involves posing a question to students, asking them to take a few minutes of thinking time and then turning to a nearby student to share their thoughts.

THINK PAIR SHARE ROUTINE

A routine for active reasoning and explanation

Think Pair Share involves posing a question to students, asking them to take a few minutes of thinking time and then turning to a nearby student to share their thoughts.

Purpose: What kind of thinking does this routine encourage?

This routine encourages students to think about something, such as a problem, question or topic, and then articulate their thoughts. The Think Pair Share routine promotes understanding through active reasoning and explanation. Because students are listening to and sharing ideas, Think Pair Share encourages students to understand multiple perspectives.

Application: When and where can it be used?

Think Pair Share can be applied at any given moment in the classroom. For example, when approaching a solution, solving a math problem, before a science experiment, or after reading a passage or chapter of a book you may ask students to take a moment to think about a particular question or issue and then turn to their neighbor and share their thoughts. Sharing can also be done in small groups. Some times you will want to have pairs or groups summarize their ideas for the whole class.

Launch: What are some tips for starting and using the routine?

When first introducing the routine, teachers may want to scaffold students' paired conversations by reminding them to take turns, listen carefully and ask questions of one another. One way to ensure that students listen to each other is to tell students that you will be calling on individuals to explain their partners thinking, as opposed to telling their own thoughts.

Encourage students to make their thinking visible by asking them to write or draw their ideas before and/or after sharing. Journals can also be useful. Student pairs can report one another's thoughts to the class and a list of ideas can be created in the classroom.

Smithsonian Institution fiscal year ... budget request to Office of Management and Budget

Smithsonian Libraries
Description based on: Fiscal year 1995 (published Sept. 1993).

Supplement information from hand-written notes on the cover.

Supplement FY 1972-1974: Major exhibition program.

Supplement FY 1973: American Revolution bicentennial program.

Supplement FY 1974: American Revolution bicentennial program -- the American experience.

Supplement FY 1975-1977: The American experience.

Stored in the Smithsonian Institution's Office of Planning, Management, and Budget.

Sterling Wortmen - Rockefeller Foundation

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Rectangle of gray and brown, bisected with band of black with Sterling Wortmen in full justification printed in gray. Black text on brown. Below, reproduction of the signatures of individual trustees separated by brown bands.

Sterling Wortmen - Rockefeller Foundation

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Rectangle of silver foil and dark brown, bisected with band of black with Sterling Wortmen in full justification printed insilver. Black text on brown. Below, reproduction of the signatures of individual trustees separated by brown bands.

Colored block and eight lines individually embossed.

Business Card of Hector Guimard

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Business card printed with the name, professional affiliations and address of the French architect, Hector Guimard. Art Nouveau style type font. Text at center justification, address at lower right corner.

Business Card of Hector Guimard

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Business card printed with the name, professional affiliations and address of the French architect, Hector Guimard. Art Nouveau style type font. Text at center justification, address at lower right corner.

Business Card of Hector Guimard

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Business card printed with the name, professional affiliations and address of the French architect, Hector Guimard. Art Nouveau style type font. Text at center justification, address at lower right corner.

Business Card of Hector Guimard

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Business card printed with the name, professional affiliations and address of the French architect, Hector Guimard. Art Nouveau style type font. Text at center justification, address at lower right corner.

Business Card of Hector Guimard

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Business card printed with the name, professional affiliations and address of the French architect, Hector Guimard. Art Nouveau style type font. Text at center justification, address at lower right corner.

Business Card of Hector Guimard

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Business card printed with the name, professional affiliations and address of the French architect, Hector Guimard. Art Nouveau style type font. Text at center justification, address at lower right corner.

Business Card of Hector Guimard

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Business card printed with the name, professional affiliations and address of the French architect, Hector Guimard. Art Nouveau style type font. Text at center justification, address at lower right corner.

Business Card of Hector Guimard

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Business card printed with the name, professional affiliations and address of the French architect, Hector Guimard. Art Nouveau style type font. Text at center justification, address at lower right corner.

Business Card of Hector Guimard

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Business card printed with the name, professional affiliations and address of the French architect, Hector Guimard. Art Nouveau style type font. Text at center justification, address at lower right corner.

Business Card of Hector Guimard

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Business card printed with the name, professional affiliations and address of the French architect, Hector Guimard. Art Nouveau style type font. Text at center justification, address at lower right corner.

Bowl

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Bhairava

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Pectis mornicola Urb. & Ekman in Urb.

NMNH - Botany Dept.
Annotated by D.J. Keil (1987) as "holotype", justification unclear.

Ardisia tuerckheimii Donn. Sm.

NMNH - Botany Dept.
Specimen from the John Donnell Smith herbarium, annotated as "Type" and "Holotype" by C.L. Lundell. Another sheet (USNH 1339941), originally from the John Donnell Smith herbarium, has been de-accessioned and sent as gift to Lundell; see Pipoly & Ricketson (2003) for extensive discussion of typification and justification for lectotypification.

Clayfest No. 8, for the Herron Gallery, Indianapolis Center for Contemporary Art

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Dark blue sans serif typography with a heavy blue border on gray cardboard. The letters of the title, in upper quadrant, and also text at bottom of sheet, are tangent to borders. Center justification text reads as follows: HERRON GALLERY / Indianapolis Center for Contemporary Art / CLAYFEST No. 8 / A Juried Biennial of / INDIANA CERAMIC ARTISTS / [in script] and / AMACO SELECTS: TEN YEARS / OF CERAMIC WORKSHOPS / DECEMBER 5, 1992 - JANUARY 8, 1993

Address block follows. Acknowledgements across bottom of sheet.
1-24 of 104 Resources