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Understanding Weather and Climate– Lesson 9: Ocean Currents- Inquiry 9.2 Prep Work

Smithsonian Science Education Center
"Quick Tips: Resources for Teachers” is a series of short videos providing down-to-earth advice and instructional tips to teachers of STC™, our signature science curriculum. Each “Quick Tip” offers practical suggestions by experienced teachers for handling materials or managing classrooms in science investigations.

Teaching Historical Inquiry with Objects week 3 conversation

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Kathy and Naomi take questions on building compelling questions and finding museum resources for the classroom.

John Peabody Harrington papers: Memoranda prepared in response to letters of inquiry, circa 1940s-circa 1950s, undated

National Anthropological Archives
This subseries is part of the Notes and writings on special linguistic studies series in the John P. Harrington papers. The memoranda are a result of Harrington's responsibility as ethnologist at the Bureau of American Ethnology to respond to various letters of inquiry from scholars and members of the general public. Harrington did not answer these reference letters directly but drafted memoranda which were used as the basis for replies by the current clerk or chief of the bureau, specifically Matthew W. Stirling and Frank H. H. Roberts. The inquiries deal with many American languages as well as some others throughout the world. The subjects usually involve questions on the etymology of words or geographic names or requests for translations into other languages of English greetings, names, numbers, or such common words as "man," "mother," and "father."

An inquiry into the principles of beauty in Grecian architecture. By George, Earl of Aberdeen

Smithsonian Libraries
"Extracted from Wilkins's translation of Vitruvius, to which this work is an introduction."

Wand of Inquiry, (sculpture)

Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums
Carlock, Marty, "A Guide to Public Art in Greater Boston," Boston: Harvard Common Press, 1988.

Save Outdoor Sculpture, Massachusetts survey, 1997.

Two abstract stainless steel spirals.

Hail to the chief [sound recording] : an inquiry into the powers of the presidency: a documentary / produced by Anthony G. Pilla

Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
Program notes (15 p.) inserted in container.

The isthmus of Darien in 1852. Journal of the expedition of inquiry for the junction of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. By Lionel Osborne. With four maps

Smithsonian Libraries
Also printed, for private circulation, London, 1853, under title: Journal of a trip to Darien.

Special Orders No. 31 [printed document]

Archives Center - NMAH
In Box 1, Folder 21.

Civil War Selections from the Archives Center

Special Orders No. 31, Headquarters Department of Mississippi, Vicksburg, Miss., February 6, 1866, including orders for courts-martial. Includes an order for the postponement of the execution of James S. Roberts, and for the trial of members of the Colored Infantry (by officers of the Colored Artillery and Colored Infantry) for killing a civilian's hog.

Katherine Neill Ridgley

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in Torch, April 1993

Katherine Neill Ridgley, manager of the Visitor Information and Associates' Reception Center's Public Inquiry Mail and Telephone Service unit, is frequently inundated with letters and phone calls.

Smithsonian in Your Classroom: Minerals, Crystals, and Gems: Stepping-Stones to Inquiry

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
Lesson plans introduce students to mineral science and the scientific process of observation, hypothesis, and conclusion. Students create a mineral exhibit, observe the factors in crystal growth, and go on a mineral scavenger hunt.

Smithsonian in Your Classroom: Minerals, Crystals, and Gems: Stepping-Stones to Inquiry

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
Lesson plans introduce students to mineral science and the scientific process of observation, hypothesis, and conclusion.

Think / Puzzle / Explore: Project Zero Visible Thinking Routine

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
A "Visible Thinking" routine that sets the stage for deeper inquiry from Project Zero. It activates prior knowledge, generates ideas and curiosity and sets the stage for deeper inquiry. Uses questions, such as, "What do you think you know about this topic?", "What questions or puzzles do you have?", and "What does the topic make you want to explore?"

THINK / PUZZLE / EXPLORE

A routine that sets the stage for deeper inquiry

1. What do you think you know about this topic?

2. What questions or puzzles do you have?

3. What does the topic make you want to explore?

Purpose: What kind of thinking does this routine encourage?

This routine activates prior knowledge, generates ideas and curiosity and sets the stage for deeper inquiry.

Application: When and where can it be used?

This routine works especially well when introducing a new topic, concept or theme in the classroom. It helps students take stock of what they already know and then pushes students to identify puzzling questions or areas of interest to pursue. Teachers can get a good sense of where students are on a conceptual level and, by returning to the routine over the course of study, they can identify development and progress. The third question is useful in helping students lay the ground work for independent inquiry.

Launch: What are some tips for starting and using this routine?

With the introduction of new topic--for example, earth, leaves, fractions, Buddhism--the class can engage in the routine together to create a group list of ideas. Between each phase of the routine, that is with each question, adequate time needs to be given for individuals to think and identify their ideas. You may even want to have students write down their individual ideas before sharing them out as a class. In some cases, you may want to have students carry out the routine individually on paper or in their heads before working on a new area.

Keep a visible record of students' ideas. If you are working in a group, ask students to share some of their thoughts and collect a broad list of ideas about the topic on chart paper. Or students can write their individual responses on post-it notes and later add them to a class list of ideas.

Note that it is common for students to have misconceptions at this point--include them on the list so all ideas are available for consideration after further study. Students may at first list seemingly simplistic ideas and questions. Include these on the whole class list but push students to think about things that are truly puzzling or interesting to them.

See/Think/Wonder: Project Zero Visible Thinking Routine

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
A "Visible Thinking" routine for exploring works of art and other interesting things from Project Zero. This routine encourages students to make careful observations and thoughtful interpretations. It helps stimulate curiosity and sets the stage for inquiry. Asks the questions, "What do you see?", "What do you think about that?", and "What does it make you wonder?" SEE / THINK / WONDER

A routine for exploring works of art and other interesting things

What do you see? What do you think about that? What does it make you wonder?

Purpose: What kind of thinking does this routine encourage?

This routine encourages students to make careful observations and thoughtful interpretations. It helps stimulate curiosity and sets the stage for inquiry.

Application: When and where can it be used?

Use this routine when you want students to think carefully about why something looks the way it does or is the way it is. Use the routine at the beginning of a new unit to motivate student interest or try it with an object that connects to a topic during the unit of study. Consider using the routine with an interesting object near the end of a unit to encourage students to further apply their new knowledge and ideas.

Launch: What are some tips for starting and using this routine?

Ask students to make an observation about an object--it could be an artwork, image, artifact or topic--and follow up with what they think might be going on or what they think this observation might be. Encourage students to back up their interpretation with reasons. Ask students to think about what this makes them wonder about the object or topic.

The routine works best when a student responds by using the three stems together at the same time, i.e., "I see..., I think..., I wonder..." However, you may find that students begin by using one stem at a time, and that you need to scaffold each response with a follow up question for the next stem.

The routine works well in a group discussion but in some cases you may want to ask students to try the routine individually on paper or in their heads before sharing out as a class. Student responses to the routine can be written down and recorded so that a class chart of observations, interpretations and wonderings are listed for all to see and return to during the course of study.

The 3Ys: Project Zero Global Competency Routine

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
A "Global Competency" routine for developing intrisic motivation to investigate a topic from Project Zero. This routine encourages students to uncover the significance of a topic in multiple contexts, to make local-global connections, and to situate themselves in a global context. Asks the questions,"Why might this [topic, question] matter to me?", "Why might it matter to people around me [family, friends, city, nation]?, and "Why might it matter to the world?"

THE 3Ys

A global thinking routine

1. Why might this [topic, question] matter to me?

2. Why might it matter to people around me [family, friends, city, nation]?

3. Why might it matter to the world?

Purpose: This routine encourages students to develop intrinsic motivation to investigate a topic by uncovering the significance of such topics in multiple contexts, make local-global connections, and situate themselves in a global context.

Application: When and where can it be used?

Use this routine when you want students to consider carefully why the topic might be worth investigating. They become aware of how a topic, issue or question has far-ranging impact and consequences at the local and the global levels. Use this routine when you would like students to explore applications of what they are learning in local--global context.

Tips for use:

Use with image, text, quote, video or other inviting materials. Make sure learners understand the exact meeting of "it" the topic or question (e.g. "the growing inequality depicted in this image") prior to engaging the 3Ys. Use the questions in the order proposed or in reverse order. If time allows, compare and group students' thoughts to find shared motivations and rationales for learning.
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