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Found 69 Resources

Kill All Jews!?

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of a window on the subway with "KILL ALL JEWS" written on it. The head of a man in a hat is visible in the bottom center.

Ku Klux Klan

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of the head and shoulders of a member of the KKK wearing a hood so that only his eyes are visible.

Dirty Bastards!?

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of four African American children playing in the street. On the wall behind them, racist graffiti.

Pin-back button for N.A.A.C.P. Legal Defense Fund anti-lynching campaign

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A blue and white circular pinback button. The top half reads "STOP LYNCHING" in white on blue background; the lower half reads "N.A.A.C.P. / LEGAL DEFENSE FUND" in blue on a white background.

First-Ever Federal Transgender Hate Crime Sentence Handed Down

Smithsonian Magazine

Mercedes Williamson wanted to become a cosmetologist and loved spending time outside. But in 2015, her life was cut brutally short. Now, reports Reuters, her murderer has been convicted in federal court—the first ever prosecution of a hate crime against a transgender person.

Williamson, a 17-year-old trans woman, was stabbed and beaten to death with a hammer in Mississippi. As Sun Herald’s Margaret Baker reports, the teenager, who was from Alabama, was apparently lured to the state to meet her one time romantic partner, Joshua Vallum. At first, reports Baker, he denied killing her because of her gender identity, but in 2016 he admitted doing so.

Last year, Vallum pleaded guilty to Williamson’s murder and was sentenced to life in prison. But since Mississippi has no state statute protecting people’s gender identities, federal prosecutors brought a second case against him.

A federal judge sentenced Vallum to a 49-year prison sentence for the crime, Reuters reports, under a 2009 hate crime law. The Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act made it easier to prosecute hate crimes. It has criminalizes violent acts related to gender identity, sexual orientation, perceived race or religion and other identities. The law was passed in honor of two murders: a Wyoming man who was beaten to death for being gay and an African-American man from Texas who was dragged behind a car by white supremacists because of his race.

In 2016, the Human Rights Campaign tracked the murders of at least 22 transgender people, and at least ten transgender people have been killed in 2017.

The Southeastern United States is particularly dangerous for transgender people; the murder rate of known victims was twice that of other regions between 2013 and 2015. However, like Mississippi, most Southern states either lack hate crime laws that cover gender orientation or don’t have hate crime laws at all. As the Movement Advancement Project notes , 24 percent of the LGBT population in the U.S. lives in states with hate crime laws that cover neither gender orientation nor sexual identity.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. is stopped by police at Medgar Evers' funeral, Jackson, MS

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This black-and-white photograph depicts Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. His face is framed by the head and shoulders of two men in the foreground.

Scene from Tulsa Race Riot June 1st 1921

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This black-and-white photographic postcard, titled Scene from Tulsa Race Riot June 1st 1921 depicts a group of men and women standing along the side of the road in front of two cars. The men to the right of the image are armed.

Ruins of the Tulsa Race Riot 6-1-21

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This black-and-white photographic postcard titled, Ruins of the Tulsa Race Riot depicts what is left of the Greenwood district in downtown Tulsa after the fires had been suppressed. This image shows that only foundations and some reminents of furniture and personal belongings are left in the rubble.

Photograph of Emmett Till with his mother, Mamie Till Mobley

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Black and white photographic print of Emmet Till and his mother, Mamie Till Mobley. Till wears a white shirt with tie and looks straight ahead. His mother, in a dark dress with light-colored ruffled collar, sits with her arm around his shoulders.

Coretta Scott King with family and mourners en route to Memphis City Hall after murder of MLK, Memphis, TN

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s family leading the memorial march held in Memphis after his assassination.

Crowd outside Lorraine Motel after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of a large crowd gathered outside the Lorraine Motel after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. Microphones and speakers are set up on the crowded second story balcony. A few members of CBS News have set up on the roof.

Memorial Service for James Chaney, Mickey Schwerner, and Andrew Goodman

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of an African American child whose right hand appears to be bandaged.

Till boy's funeral, Burr Oaks Cemetary [sic]

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Black-and-white image of seven individuals during outdoor funeral service; features two women dressed in black prominently in the foreground. The woman on the right has her left hand raised. There are multiple inscriptions on the back.

Ten shards of stained glass

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A collection of glass shards collected from the gutter outside the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, at the funeral of the four girls killed in the bombing.

Shotgun shell found outside the16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A shotgun shell collected from the gutter outside the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, at the funeral of the four girls killed in the bombing. The shell has a blue/green-colored body with brass tip.

Jet Vol. IX No. 3

National Museum of African American History and Culture
An issue of Jet magazine from November 24, 1955. The cover features a photo of Hilda Simms and Sidney Poitier surrounded by black, white, and orange print. The interior contains an article about the Emmett Till trial.

The Freedom Summer Murders

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Card number 64.8 in a series of information cards relating to major historical events in the United States. On front, the title and photos of the three murdered Civil Rights workers. On back, black text giving the history of the Freedom Summer murders.

Jet Vol. VIII No. 18

National Museum of African American History and Culture
An issue of Jet magazine from September 8, 1955. The cover features a photo of Lucille Rich surrounded by black and teal print. The inside has an article about Emmett Till on pages 3-4, titled: [Chicago boy, 14, Kidnaped (sic) by Mississippi Whites]. The cover has ink markings in three places.

Jet Vol. VIII No. 19

National Museum of African American History and Culture
An issue of Jet magazine from September 15, 1955. The cover features a photo of Beverly Weathersby surrounded by black and olive print. The interior contains an article about Emmett Till on pages 6-9. The article is titled "Nation horrified by Murder of Kidnapped Chicago Youth."

Placard from memorial march reading "HONOR KING: END RACISM!"

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A placard comprised of black ink on white (yellowing) card stock. Text reads [HONOR/ KING: / END/ RACISM!]. There is a small hole at the top where the placard would have been stapled to wood and carried. The back has a series of handwritten numbers on the top center edge.

Maryland, My Maryland!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A lithographic print depicting the 1931 lynching of a man, Matthew Williams, in Salisbury, Maryland. Williams is hanging from a tree with a rope around his neck. He wears a bandage on his head and his body is contorted with head down, knees bent, fingers splayed and toes curled. In the background are houses and buildings, and what may be smoke from a fire rising from the lower left corner. The print is titled and signed by the artist on the front.

Birmingham, Alabama. SNCC Workers Outside the Funeral

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of a crowd outdoors; an African American woman holds an American flag and in the back an African American man shades himself from the sun under an umbrella.

Photographic print of Ira Tucker at the Lorraine Motel

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A color photograph with white borders of Ira Tucker and an unknown women standing on the second floor balcony outside of room 306 at the Lorraine Motel, where MLK was assasinated. There are several flower arrangements on the balcony.

The door has a white cross on it. The photograph has been mounted onto a stiff paper. “P03/ 8907/ Tea” has been written in graphite on the verso of the object. “B 807611” is printed on the photograph on the verso right edge and is visible where the photograph overlaps the backing board.

Rope used to lynch Matthew Williams

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A section of rope (a) tethered to a handwritten note that is in two pieces (bc).The note, written by Paul Henderson, is composed of graphite on tan paper, in a faint hand at the top is [Lyncher's Rope]. The main text of the note starts [Rope "souvenir" which was used by Salisbury, Md. mob to hang Matthew Williams, 23-year-old citizen]. Secured to the bottom of the note with two pieces of twine, the rope has been soaked in oil and appears brown in color. The note has been folded in multiple places and worn at the folds. It has been repaired with tape at the top fold and the bottom portion, holds the rope, has come completely detached.
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