Skip to Content

Found 3,076 Resources

The March on Washington: We Shall Overcome!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
The sleeve is white and gold with black, gold, and white text. The label is red with silver text. The album features speeches and music from the March on Washington on August 28, 1963.

NAACP Civil Rights Convention

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of Benjamin O. Davis, Jr., Joe Louis, Thurgood Marshall, and Daisy Lampkin seated outside under an open-air tent.

First base used in Inaugural Civil Rights Game

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Square first base baseball base used in the 2007 inaugural Major League Baseball [MLB] Civil Rights baseball game. Top of base has printed design featuring an illustration of three fists grabbing a bat. Next to the design, black type reads, [CIVIL / RIGHTS / GAME]. Text that reads: [Original Hollywood Base/ Jack Corbett / Schutt Sports] is impressed over the design and black text. The MLB logo is both in ink and impressed on the top of the base. Four rectangular plaques appear on the sides of the base. Two of the sides feature plaques that have the MLB logo next to white type that reads, [CIVIL RIGHTS GAME]. One of the other sides has red type that reads, [St. Louis] in the style of the St. Louis Cardinals logo. The last side reads in red type, [Cleveland] in the style of the Cleveland Indians logo. Handwritten in black on bottom edge of the base is: [1ST B / SET B]. A sticker is near the black handwriting. There is also a stamp in red that reads: [Nov 28 2006]. There is dirt on all over the base.

Civil Rights Demonstration, Washington, DC

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A crowd of people face away from the camera towards the Lincoln Memorial in the background. In the foreground, more people sit on the steps facing the camera.

Group of civil rights strategists [cellulose acetate photonegative]

Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Group of five men. No ink on negative. "7 AGFA SAFETY FILM" edge imprint. No Scurlock number.

"A. Phillip Randolph" on original envelope, obviously incorrect. According to Craig Simpson in an e-mail (13 Nov. 2012): "This image is probably misidentified. This appears to be a delegation that called on O. John Rogge, first assistant attorney general of US, to demand Department of Justice action in Georgia peonage cases and South Carolina cases of mob violence by the Ku Klux Klan. Left to right: Louis Colman, New York, assistant national secretary of the International Labor Defense; William L. Patterson, Chicago, vice president of the International Labor Defense; Charles H. Houston, counsel for the National Association for Advancement of Colored People; J. Finley Wilson, grand exalted ruler of the Elks; and John P. Davis, executive secretary of the National Negro Congress. See April 27, 1940 of Chicago Defender, page 4, "National Negro Congress Girds for Third Conference" for photo of what seem to be the same people in the same room (window is the same, shade drawn to the same length and desk is slightly visible, bottom of frame of photo visible in Scurlock photo is also visible in Defender image)." Similar to AC0618.004.0000424.tif.

Group of civil rights strategists: Atty. Chas. Houston, J. Finley Wilson, and John P. Davis [cellulose acatate photonegatives]

Archives Center, National Museum of American History
CORRECTION NEEDED FOR IMAGE ORIENTATION.

No Ink on negative. Ink on enclosure: "Group of civil rights strategists: Atty. Chas. Houston, J. Finley Wilson, and John P. Davis." Five men in a room; two standing, one with hands on hips; one sitting on the back of a chair with hat in hand; one sitting with legs crossed and a hat; and one sitting with elbows on knees. "Agfa Safety Film" edge imprint. No Scurlock number. Similar to AC0618.004.0001023.tif. According to Craig Simpson in an e-mail (13 Nov. 2012): "...This appears to be a delegation that called on O. John Rogge, first assistant attorney general of US, to demand Department of Justice action in Georgia peonage cases and South Carolina cases of mob violence by the Ku Klux Klan. Left to right: Louis Colman, New York, assistant national secretary of the International Labor Defense; William L. Patterson, Chicago, vice president of the International Labor Defense; Charles H. Houston, counsel for the National Association for Advancement of Colored People; J. Finley Wilson, grand exalted ruler of the Elks; and John P. Davis, executive secretary of the National Negro Congress. See April 27, 1940 of Chicago Defender, page 4, "National Negro Congress Girds for Third Conference" for photo of what seem to be the same people in the same room (window is the same, shade drawn to the same length and desk is slightly visible, bottom of frame of photo visible in Scurlock photo is also visible in Defender image)."

Policemen Use Police Dogs During Civil Rights Demonstrations, Birmingham Protests

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of an African American man having his left pant leg torn off by a police dog. There are several white police officers with additional dogs and several other African American demonstrators standing in a crowd. The print is signed [Charles Moore] on the back in pencil.

Denim vest worn by Joan Mulholland during Civil Rights Movement

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A worn denim vest with 23 pin-back buttons on it. The collar and arm openings are worn and fraying/ The name "Mulholland" is sewn in at the collar.

Singer Harry Belafonte, speaking at civil rights rally at Statue of Liberty

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of Harry Belafonte speaking at a podium with the Statue of Liberty in the background.

Civil Rights Conference at H.U. [Howard University], Nov[ember] 1963 [cellulose acetate photonegative]

Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Man standing at lectern with several microphones on a stage. Two other men and a woman sit on chairs at the side of the stage. No ink on negative. Ink on envelope: caption and "8 glossy ea". "KODAK - SAFETY -- FILM" edge imprint. Retouching on face with New Coccine.

Civil Rights March Blocking Traffic on Franklin Street as Marchers Weave Back and Forth through the Main Business District

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A digital image of a Civil Rights march blocking traffic on Franklin Street as marchers weave back and forth through the main business district.

Sign, NAACP Voter Registration Headquarters

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Life Magazine, March 19, 1965

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Button, One Man One Vote

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Alabama Fire Department Aims High-Pressure Water Hoses at Civil Rights Demonstrators

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of two African American men and an African American woman being sprayed with high-pressure fire hoses. They are leaning against the glass windows of a brick building. The man on the far right is being hit directly in the lower back with the stream of water from the hose. The print is signed [Charles Moore] on the back in pencil.

Straw sombrero hat associated with Civil Rights campaign, Camden, Alabama

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A woven straw sombrero hat with a rounded crown and wide brim with rolled edges. The ends of some straw pieces are loose on the brim. The hat has writing in brown marker on the crown and underside of the brim. The words [Peace] and [Love] are written around the base of the crown. A floral design and additional text is found on the top of the crown. The underside of the brim is filled with additional writing. It includes names: [Carl], [Sophia], [Lena], and [Estella]. It also includes word and phrases: [Soul], [Sister], [Brother], and [Can you dig it]. The hat was worn by Lena Jo Anderson during the Civil Rights campaign in Camden, Alabama.

In a Show of Support that Brought Together Different Factions of the Movement, Civil Rights Leaders Joined Funeral Procession of NAACP Activist Medgar Evers, Jackson, Mississippi, 1963

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of a crowd of people dressed in suits, or funeral attire, walking in a procession through the streets of Jackson, Mississippi.

Pen used by Lyndon B. Johnson to sign the 1964 Civil Rights Act

National Museum of African American History and Culture
An Esterbrook pen with an Esterbrook 2668 nib. The pen has a black plastic grip and a clear plastic body, with [THE PRESIDENT- THE WHITE HOUSE] printed in white ink. [ESTERBROOK] and [MADE IN U.S.A.] are imprinted on the black pen grip. Type reading: [ESTERBROOK / 2668 / MADE IN USA] is imprinted on the nib. The pen was one of the pens President Lyndon B. Johnson used to sign the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

LBJ - President Signs Civil Rights Bill

National Portrait Gallery
President Lyndon Johnson signs the Civil Rights Bill at the White House

After criticizing President John F. Kennedy for failing to advance civil rights legislation, King was elated when Kennedy addressed the nation on June 11, 1963, and pledged to seek passage of a civil rights bill that would provide "equality of treatment" to every American. Sent to the House on June 19, the bill soon became stalled in committee, where it languished until President Kennedy’s assassination on November 22. Declaring that prompt passage of Kennedy’s civil rights bill would be the most fitting way to honor the late president, Lyndon Johnson successfully pressured Congress to bring it to a vote. The bill cleared the House on February 10, 1964, and reached the Senate floor on March 30, where it was blocked by a filibuster until June 10. When the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was finally signed into law by President Johnson on July 2, King (second row, center) attended the ceremony.

Late 40's / Early civil rights group picket / "Jim Crow" showing of "Gone with the Wind" / at the uptown Lincoln Theater. Rufus Byars / mgr. of Lincoln on left. [Caption on verso] [2 paper photoprints,] 1947 [more likely 1940]

Archives Center, National Museum of American History
The movie being picketed is "Gone with the Wind." The dating of 1947 seems erroneous. The film played at the Lincoln Theater in 1940, and the protest picketing which occurred was covered in a number of newspapers. Several figures carry signs with messages such as "A dollar and ten 'gone...with the wind". Print is on resin-coated paper, so is probably a much later restrike print by Robert Scurlock, ca. 1970s.

Complete caption quoted above in ink on verso of print A. Print B is marked "Picketing at Lincoln Theater / late 40s". Note: see also records for the original negative for these prints, as well as additional prints, all of which contain the subject heading "Gone with the wind."

Coretta Scott King is being protected by police officers and civil rights workers as she leaves Ebenezer Baptist Church

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This black and white photograph shows Coretta Scott King leaving Ebenezer Baptist Church after Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday commemoration in 1969. Coretta Scott King is in the center of the photograph, mostly obscured by a man in a black hat. King's patterned coat and the side of her head can be seen. King is being directed by a uniformed officer. There is an unidentified man leaving behind King. Crowds can be seen in the background. There is a press reel camera in front of the photographer. The back of the photograph has a manufacturer's mark, and handwritten and printer's inscriptions.

Button, "Give Us This Day Our Civil Rights"

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
The most basic right of citizenship has been equal access and protection under the law. The fight to extend this right to all began before the Declaration of Independence proclaimed “all men are created equal,” and continues today.

Museum of History and Technology, Hall of Historic Americans

Smithsonian Institution Archives
A Credo of Human Rights
1-24 of 3,076 Resources