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The March on Washington: We Shall Overcome!

National Museum of African American History and Culture

NAACP Civil Rights Convention

National Museum of African American History and Culture

First base used in Inaugural Civil Rights Game

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Civil Rights Demonstration, Washington, DC

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Group of civil rights strategists [cellulose acetate photonegative]

Archives Center - NMAH
Group of five men. No ink on negative. "7 AGFA SAFETY FILM" edge imprint. No Scurlock number.

"A. Phillip Randolph" on original envelope, obviously incorrect. According to Craig Simpson in an e-mail (13 Nov. 2012): "This image is probably misidentified. This appears to be a delegation that called on O. John Rogge, first assistant attorney general of US, to demand Department of Justice action in Georgia peonage cases and South Carolina cases of mob violence by the Ku Klux Klan. Left to right: Louis Colman, New York, assistant national secretary of the International Labor Defense; William L. Patterson, Chicago, vice president of the International Labor Defense; Charles H. Houston, counsel for the National Association for Advancement of Colored People; J. Finley Wilson, grand exalted ruler of the Elks; and John P. Davis, executive secretary of the National Negro Congress. See April 27, 1940 of Chicago Defender, page 4, "National Negro Congress Girds for Third Conference" for photo of what seem to be the same people in the same room (window is the same, shade drawn to the same length and desk is slightly visible, bottom of frame of photo visible in Scurlock photo is also visible in Defender image)." Similar to AC0618.004.0000424.tif.

Group of civil rights strategists: Atty. Chas. Houston, J. Finley Wilson, and John P. Davis [cellulose acatate photonegatives]

Archives Center - NMAH
CORRECTION NEEDED FOR IMAGE ORIENTATION.

No Ink on negative. Ink on enclosure: "Group of civil rights strategists: Atty. Chas. Houston, J. Finley Wilson, and John P. Davis." Five men in a room; two standing, one with hands on hips; one sitting on the back of a chair with hat in hand; one sitting with legs crossed and a hat; and one sitting with elbows on knees. "Agfa Safety Film" edge imprint. No Scurlock number. Similar to AC0618.004.0001023.tif. According to Craig Simpson in an e-mail (13 Nov. 2012): "...This appears to be a delegation that called on O. John Rogge, first assistant attorney general of US, to demand Department of Justice action in Georgia peonage cases and South Carolina cases of mob violence by the Ku Klux Klan. Left to right: Louis Colman, New York, assistant national secretary of the International Labor Defense; William L. Patterson, Chicago, vice president of the International Labor Defense; Charles H. Houston, counsel for the National Association for Advancement of Colored People; J. Finley Wilson, grand exalted ruler of the Elks; and John P. Davis, executive secretary of the National Negro Congress. See April 27, 1940 of Chicago Defender, page 4, "National Negro Congress Girds for Third Conference" for photo of what seem to be the same people in the same room (window is the same, shade drawn to the same length and desk is slightly visible, bottom of frame of photo visible in Scurlock photo is also visible in Defender image)."

Policemen Use Police Dogs During Civil Rights Demonstrations, Birmingham Protests

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Denim vest worn by Joan Mulholland during Civil Rights Movement

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Singer Harry Belafonte, speaking at civil rights rally at Statue of Liberty

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Sign, NAACP Voter Registration Headquarters

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Life Magazine, March 19, 1965

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Civil Rights Conference at H.U. [Howard University], Nov[ember] 1963 [cellulose acetate photonegative]

Archives Center - NMAH
Man standing at lectern with several microphones on a stage. Two other men and a woman sit on chairs at the side of the stage. No ink on negative. Ink on envelope: caption and "8 glossy ea". "KODAK - SAFETY -- FILM" edge imprint. Retouching on face with New Coccine.

Button, One Man One Vote

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Alabama Fire Department Aims High-Pressure Water Hoses at Civil Rights Demonstrators

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Straw sombrero hat associated with Civil Rights campaign, Camden, Alabama

National Museum of African American History and Culture

Pen used by Lyndon B. Johnson to sign the 1964 Civil Rights Act

National Museum of African American History and Culture

LBJ - President Signs Civil Rights Bill

National Portrait Gallery
President Lyndon Johnson signs the Civil Rights Bill at the White House

After criticizing President John F. Kennedy for failing to advance civil rights legislation, King was elated when Kennedy addressed the nation on June 11, 1963, and pledged to seek passage of a civil rights bill that would provide "equality of treatment" to every American. Sent to the House on June 19, the bill soon became stalled in committee, where it languished until President Kennedy’s assassination on November 22. Declaring that prompt passage of Kennedy’s civil rights bill would be the most fitting way to honor the late president, Lyndon Johnson successfully pressured Congress to bring it to a vote. The bill cleared the House on February 10, 1964, and reached the Senate floor on March 30, where it was blocked by a filibuster until June 10. When the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was finally signed into law by President Johnson on July 2, King (second row, center) attended the ceremony.

Late 40's / Early civil rights group picket / "Jim Crow" showing of "Gone with the Wind" / at the uptown Lincoln Theater. Rufus Byars / mgr. of Lincoln on left. [Caption on verso] [2 paper photoprints,] 1947 [more likely 1940]

Archives Center - NMAH
The movie being picketed is "Gone with the Wind." The dating of 1947 seems erroneous. The film played at the Lincoln Theater in 1940, and the protest picketing which occurred was covered in a number of newspapers. Several figures carry signs with messages such as "A dollar and ten 'gone...with the wind". Print is on resin-coated paper, so is probably a much later restrike print by Robert Scurlock, ca. 1970s.

Complete caption quoted above in ink on verso of print A. Print B is marked "Picketing at Lincoln Theater / late 40s". Note: see also records for the original negative for these prints, as well as additional prints, all of which contain the subject heading "Gone with the wind."

Button, "Give Us This Day Our Civil Rights"

National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
The most basic right of citizenship has been equal access and protection under the law. The fight to extend this right to all began before the Declaration of Independence proclaimed “all men are created equal,” and continues today.

Museum of History and Technology, Hall of Historic Americans

Smithsonian Institution Archives
A Credo of Human Rights

May Lee Whitsett (b. 1890)

Smithsonian Institution Archives
During the mid-1930s, while on the faculty at Southern Methodist University, May Lee Whitsett (b. 1890) was active in the Dallas, Texas, branch of the NAACP.
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