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Found 52 Collections

 

​Native Americans and Manifest Destiny

A collection of images focusing on the Native Americans and their vanishing cultures due to Manifest Destiny.

Lesson Concept

Travis Meserve

Bowling Green High School, Bowling Green, KY

Grade levels: 9-12

11th grade American Literature Focus for English Second Language Learners

Lesson Time: 50 minutes

Procedure:

1.  Show the students a copy of the painting “Westward the Course of Empire Makes Its Way” by Emanuel Leutze (1861). Ask the students to spend a few moments observing the work in silence, noticing any details that draw their eyes.  Ask the students to let their eyes touch every part of the canvas/picture.

2. Using the teaching strategy “See Think Wonder” ask the students to volunteer details in the work that they see.  Ask them to describe only what they observe in the work (e.g. “I see a man in a fur hat holding a gun”). After the student makes a factual observation, ask the student “What do you see that makes you say that?” if the student says something that is not immediately obvious (e.g. the student sees a wooden sailing ship trapped in sea ice but describes it as a cabin).  Do not correct the student.  Let other students make observations and possibly correct each other through observation and discussion.  After the student is satisfied with an observation, follow up with the question “What do you think about that?” Allow the student to offer any interpretations of what the detail means for the content of the work, the tone, the theme etc.  Avoiding any value judgements, summarize back to the student his or her interpretation and evidential observations supplying any vocabulary the student might lack, asking for the student’s approval of the final summary. Continue this procedure until the students exhaust their observations or the class time restraints are reached.  Finally, follow up with the question “What does this work (or specific observation) make you wonder about?”

3. At this point, ask the students to note anything that they do not see but would expect to be represented in the scene.  Second Language Learners who have been in the USA for 2-3 years would probably have some general ideas about the history of the USA and may be able to offer such absences.  If not, the teacher may need to point out that no Native Americans appear in the main scene.  If the students do not notice the border of the work, point out that there are small scenes in the border that add content/connections to the main scene. Point out that two Native Americans appear there, small and crawling.

4. Ask the students to make a journal entry writing their thoughts about the work, specifically noting the Americans who are represented as moving across the land and the Americans who are not represented.

Extensions:

  1. If the students have enough command of the language, the teacher can discuss representing fact versus propaganda.  Discuss the painting as advertisement for the movement west despite its factual inaccuracies (e.g. the painting depicts California as visible from the Rocky Mountains although it is actually 1,200 miles away).  Contrast this with a handbill distributed in the Dust Bowl areas advertising workers needed in California to pick crops (in reality the number of workers was greater than the jobs available). A possible literary connection could be to The Grapes of Wrath.

  2. Use the painting periodically through the course of American Literature.  Students’ reactions to the work may evolve as they expand their ideas of American history, manifest destiny, and the immigrant experience.  Allow students to write new journal entries each time they revisit the work with new knowledge.  Discuss the dialogue that gets created between the artist, the work, and the viewer based on what the viewer brings to the experience.

Purpose

Objective: The student will be able to make a factual observation about the painting and offer interpretation (where possible) citing evidence from the work.

Follow-up lessons: On subsequent viewing of the work, the student will be able to identify themes in the painting that connect to texts from American Literature (e.g. attitude toward nature, the west, immigration, manifest destiny, etc.)

Rationale for using this artwork: The painting by Leutze encapsulates many themes that permeate American Literature and lends itself to an introduction to the course as well as an anchor for the course that will bear repeated viewing.

Rationale for the the methodology: The English as a Second Language student often does not bring a lot of background knowledge about American history or art.  The See-Think-Wonder technique allows the student to engage with the work as an expert would: one who makes observations and interpretations that allow claims backed by evidence.

Skills:

Differentiating Observation (fact) from Interpretation (opinion).

Making claims based on evidence.

Practice speaking in front of peers using the target language of English.

#SAAMteach


Travis Meserve
28
 

Wonder: Learning to See

The glory of being bursting onto the streets of New York in a gush of water. And the children don't miss it. #SAAMteach

FatherJoe
10
 

What We Cannot NOT know

#SAAMteach

Lindsey Keenan
7
 

What do Americans Look Like?

The concept of racial identity and stereotypes is explored through art from different periods in U.S. history. Students explore the question of "What do Americans look like?" The aim of the activity is to demonstrate how early perceptions of American identity have become deeply embedded in the American psyche, and have resulted in racial tensions and conflict that continue to affect our country today. #SAAMteach
Ellen Fisher
16
 

We the People: a Deeper Understanding of the Preamble of the U.S. Constitution

This lesson works best for 8th grade U.S. History, after students have learned how the original plan for government (the Articles of Confederation) was failing the newly independent America and how the state delegates met in the summer of 1787 to correct these failings and ended up writing a new Constitution. 

Students start by using the VTS thinking routine to examine Preamble by Mike Wilkins, an engaging and accessible way to 'read' the Preamble of the U.S. Constitution.  

After 'decoding' the words and noticing all the details they can, students use a handout to analyze the language of the actual Preamble and discuss word choice and intended meaning (they might also look at the photo of the actual Constitution at this point to compare the original with Mike WIlkins' work).  

They then read and analyze 4 quotes from The Federalist Papers defending the Constitution to the states who were about to vote to ratify it as a jumping off point to discuss what the Constitution was meant to achieve for the newly formed states.  Discussion about reasons why states would not want to join this union will also add to the understanding of what was at stake for each state. In addition, looking at a graphic organizer showing state and federal powers under this plan for government will help students see how this system divides power between the states and the national government.

Students then return to the original artwork, and decide if analysis of the meaning of the Preamble and the ideals of the Constitution affect how students 'see' the artwork. Using the 'connect/extend/challenge' visual routine, teachers can record what the students connected to, what new ideas pushed their thinking in different directions, and what is still challenging or confusing about the artwork or the Preamble.  

Some possible extension ideas are included in the collection to highlight the differences between the states as well as their similarities/unity, such as creating another artwork using an excerpt from the Declaration of Independence (while adhering to state DMV rules for vanity plates), and  comparing front pages of different states' daily newspapers. #SAAMteach

Aileen Albertson
9
 

Walt Whitman Poetry and Art

SAAMteach - High School Level English classes

Lesson concept is included in resources

Anne Ruka
7
 

Using Art to Understand Reconstruction

This lesson is designed for a middle school (7th grade) US History lesson on Reconstruction. It is aligned with Virginia SOL USII.3B. The teacher will use Visual Thinking Strategies to help students interpret Winslow Homer's "Visit from the Old Mistress" and create more interest in the personal side of this time period. Then, students will work in partners to read a text and complete interactive notes on terms and ideas from Reconstruction. Finally, the class will come back together to use Harvard Project Zero's Visible Thinking Routines to modify their understanding of the painting based on what they have learned from the reading passage. #SAAMteach
Michelle Moses
7
 

To What Extent Was Reconstruction Successful?

This collection is designed for a high school U.S. history course and includes a unit/lesson plan that guides students through the process of writing a persuasive essay drawing on varied sources for evidence. The unit is book-ended by two lessons which analyze three separate works of art. #SAAMteach

Matt Edmonds
17
 

Think Like a Curator: George Catlin and La Malinche

This activity is designed for high school students for a unit on the Spanish Conquest of Mexico and Michael Wood's Conquistadors.

After working with primary sources from the point of view of Mexicas when the Spaniards first arrived in Mexico (from First Encounters: Native Voices on the Coming of Europeans edited by Howard B. Leavitt (2010)) and Bartolome de Las Casas' "Brief Account of the Devastation of the Indies" (1552), students will curate their own gallery comprised of Catlin's depictions of white Europeans, Native Americans, and American landscapes and various artists' depictions of Hernan Cortes' translator La Malinche.

Students will engage with the questions about Malinche that have survived to modern-day Mexico: was she a victim of conquest, or a traitor who aided in the destruction of the Aztec culture? Students will also explore poems from Gloria Anzaldua's Borderlands in considering the dual identity of Malinche and of the Native Americans depicted in Catlin's paintings.

The "Think Like a Curator" technique will guide students to place the artwork into categories, develop names for those categories, think about the order in which a museum visitor should encounter the artworks, what they would name the exhibit overall, etc. In this way, students will write their own story of La Malinche - do they want their museum visitors to walk away seeing her as a victim, or as a traitor?

Following the gallery creation, students will work individually to write a paragraph using the Claim/Support/Question thinking routine in response to one of the La Malinche paintings. Students will then share their paragraphs in small groups. This extension activity will allow students to further engage with La Malinche’s legacy after exploring different visual interpretations of her.

#SAAMteach
Rebecca Marks
40
 

The Seeing Eye: Using Edward Hopper's CAPE COD MORNING as Inspiration for Creative Writing

Objective: To examine art and poetry in an effort to see beyond the ordinary, using observation, collaboration, analysis, and inference. To create an original short story and corresponding visual text based on evidence presented in Edward Hopper’s "Cape Cod Morning." // Art is integrated into this lesson in two distinct ways: with the student as consumer AND as producer. By engaging deeply in the artwork and creating multiple artistic responses to it, students truly experience not only the genius of established masters, but the relevance of their own ideas. Benefits beyond the usual curricular outcomes include building cultural literacy and gaining confidence in "reading" art. #SAAMteach

The idea for this lesson came from an article on the Smithsonian website by Helen Appleton Read, in which the author praises Edward Hopper's "seeing eye," which is to say, his uncanny ability to create extraordinary art from mundane subject matter. The students will begin with a close look at "Cape Cod Morning," followed by a structured discussion and analysis of it. After reading Read's article, the students will explore the Seeing Eye as a literary concept by delving into the exquisite Robert Frost poem, "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening." Throughout the lesson, students will practice visual thinking in reading and writing and go on to create both an original short story and a picture inspired by Edward Hopper's "Cape Cod Morning."
Kristen Hill
10
 

The Reconstruction, Art, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Title: Reconstructing African-American Roles in Post-Civil War America.
Subject: American Literature
9-12 grades
Objectives: Using close reading of texts, themes, tying art to literature, students will consider the impact of Reconstruction on African-Americans in post-Civil War America.
Resources: art in this collection; student copies of Huck Finn; Fishkin article (in collection)
Methodology : CLAIM / SUPPORT / QUESTION METHODOLOGY (see collection)
I USED TO THINK / BUT NOW I THINK; THINK/PAIR/SHARE

#SAAMteach


Cynthia Storrs
7
 

The Paradox of Liberty: The Declaration of Independence and Slavery

This collection will be used to supplement students' rhetorical analysis of The Declaration of Independence. Earlier in the year, students discussed the paradoxical nature of the Puritans arriving in the New World to escape religious intolerance, yet they were exceedingly intolerant of other religions (i.e., Quakers). In a similar fashion, we'll examine the Declaration of Independence and a critical portion deliberately removed: references to abolishing slavery. We will examine a variety of works of art, noting the clues they give us regarding our founding fathers' often complex ideologies. #SAAMteach

Annette Spahr
5
 

The House on Mango Street pre-reading

A two-day lesson for middle schoolers to introduce some of the themes in The House on Mango Street through art representing Latino/a Americans in the 1900s.

tags: immigrant experience, culture, gender roles, women, class divide, jigsaw, see think wonder

#SAAMteach

Kim Clifton
11
 

The Coal Mining Industry: Art and Poetry

#SAAMteach

Jennifer McElroy
5
 

Tenement Lesson Concept

The purpose of this lesson is to examine tenement housing in London and New York City during the Industrial Revolution, and California during the Great Depression. The lesson will begin with a teacher led discussion/evaluation of an artwork by Millard Sheets, Tenement Flats, in which the "Claim, Support, Question" method will be utilized. Next, students will break into groups to analyze additional artwork and photographs to continue examining tenement life. They will access their assigned work and sources through Learninglab.si.edu. They will also Close Read a primary source that provides further information on the era. In small groups they will create a poster size Claim/Support/Question chart that will later be presented to their peers. The class will engage in the "Ladder of Feedback" strategy to analyze and evaluate each others work. The culminating activity will be a low-stakes writing assessment in which groups will open and share a Google Doc to write a thesis, three supporting claims followed by bulleted evidence. Each group will post their final product on Google Classroom. For homework, each individual student will be asked to read and review at least three groups' thesis/claims and post a minimum of two responses providing feedback to their peers. #SAAMteach
Ann Campbell
7
 

Shimomura and Executive Order 9066 #SAAMteach

Mrs. Warne teaches Executive Order 9066 #SAAMteach

Myra Warne
27
 

September 11, 2001

Collaborative Poem exercise

#SAAMteach

Brittni Doyle
3
 

Segregation, Integration, Desegregation

This is a collection of primary sources related to the them of segregation, integration, and desegregation.  This includes sources about Brown v. Board of Education (1954), the integration of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas (1957-1958), and the desegregation of Boston Public Schools.

#SAAMteach

Jacob Montwieler
16
 

Projecting a Message through Portraits

Examine your portrait with your partner.  Answer the three questions in your writer's notebook, being sure to write the portrait's name and artist in your notebook for reference!  What OBSERVATIONS have you made?  What INFERENCES have you made?  

Be prepared to courageously share your findings with your classmates!

#SAAMteach

Michelle Streed
15
 

Professional Development

This collection was created for the purpose of presenting professional development to my colleagues at Longleaf School of the Arts.  #SAAMteach

Brittni Doyle
3
 

Photojournalism: A Study of Perspective

This collection contains a series of photos from Camilo Jose Vergara.  The students will be asked to rate a series of photos for their chronology and how those photos can be interpreted by the viewer.  In the end, students will be asked to document an important part of their family history through photo journalism and then write about their choices and the importance of their selected art. #SAAMteach

Danielle Clayton
9
 

Perspectives on Reconstruction

Included in this collection are pieces that can be used to foster inquiry in how Reconstruction affected different groups in the South.  It also contains a lesson using one piece, Taking the Oath: and Drawing Rations along with an example of a loyalty oath from Florida for students to dive deeper into analyzing art and putting themselves into the shoes of someone living in the South during Reconstruction. 

This lesson was made for 11th Grade American History students, but can be modified for other age groups.

#SAAMteach  #bestcohort  #artislife

Rachel Sherman
9
 

Minority Identity in America

This lesson, revolving around SOB SOB by James Marshall, will analyze several different perspectives on the minority experience in the US by looking at artwork created by Muslim, Black, Indigenous, and Latino American artists.

#SAAMteach

Susan Sawczak
7
 

Memoir Story Arc: The 3000 Word Essay

Students will examine a series of images by one photographer. They will pull themes from those photos that they see in common and imagine the answer to the question: what message does this collection communicate? Then, they will create a series of images to communicate a message about their life.

***used as a scaffold for personal writing, including a draft of a college essay

#SAAMteach

Michelle Streed
13
1-24 of 52 Collections