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Found 59 Collections

 

Analyzing Cultural Identity

The following lesson is intended for high school students in an ICT English Language Arts classroom.

By the end of the lesson, students (ages 14-18), will be able to determine a central idea about identity by analyzing multiple texts. Students will apply their understanding of artwork (George Catlin's "Wi-jún-jon, Pigeon's Egg Head (The Light) Going To and Returning From Washington") to one or more poems that share conflicting themes of identity. Students are assessed on their ability to create claims, support claims with evidence, synthesize information from multiple sources, and develop a central idea about identity.


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Nick Verrillo
5
 

"She had an Inside and an outside now": Pre-reading strategies for Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God"

This lesson serves as a pre-reading/activating activity for Zora Neale Hurston's novel "Their Eyes Were Watching God." Ideally, it should be delivered before students have gained exposure to the text ( and before they have read a summary). In this activity, students will use VTS protocols on "Portrait of Mnonja" by Mickalene Thomas and "SOB, SOB" by Kerry James Marshall to explore themes related to the text and to anticipate Hurston’s complex characterization of Janie Crawford, the protagonist of the novel.

Students will have a chance to engage with literature and anticipate Huston's style in the second half of the activity by engaging in a "Think-Pair-Share" with an out of context quotation from the novel. The student pairs will combine their literary analysis with their visual analysis to determine which quotations should be collaged with each painting, and they will have the opportunity to share out and justify their opinions.

Learning Targets:
1)Students can use visual art to practice their ability to close-read and unpack
2)Students can synthesize multi-media resources to develop opinions
3)Students can use visual art to anticipate themes and characterization in "Their Eyes Were Watching God"

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ms.hughesteachesenglish
4
 

Lash's Native American Removal Collection

The objective of this lesson is to use "Pigeon's Egg Head (The Light) Going to and Returning from Washington" as a catalyst for discussion and analysis of the American government's attitude toward South East Native Americans in the early 19th Century that eventually lead to the Trail of Tears.

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Trail of Tears
Native American
Lash
Georgia Performance Standard: SS8H5
Stephanie Lash
12
 

18th Century American Identity and the Common Man

This collection includes resources that help students to draw conclusions about the "common man" and determine how American identity changed during the mid-18th Century United States. The lesson is centered around "Independence" and supporting documents include "Daniel la Motta", "Self Reliance", and Turner's Frontier Thesis. To see full lesson plan, click on "collection info".
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Julie Thoma
5
 

Dual Identity Project

Students will use George Catlin's "Wi-jun-jon, Pigeon Egg Head (The Light), Going to and Returning from Washington" and a sketch from Sherman Alexie's "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" to explore how communities and others' perceptions can affect our identities. Students will end this study by creating their own dual identity project.

This project is intended for 8th or 9th grade students who are reading "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" by Sherman Alexie. However, there are ideas on how to adapt this project to a variety of different situations in the "Adaptations" section of the Lesson Concept document.

This project is broken down into a 4 stages:
Day 1: Analyze Catlin's "Wi-jun-jon," make claims and support them, and connect the portrait back to "Absolutely True Diary."
Day 1/Day 1 HW: Read "How to Fight Monsters," make a claim about the dual identity portrait and support it, complete the Dual Identity Preparation Sheet.
Day 2: Discuss the dual identity, view an example project, brainstorm requirements, review the assignment, and begin working.
Day 3/Project Due Date: Discuss what makes identity complicated and how Catlin and Alexie express this in their portraits.

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Sydnee Lindblom
9
 

Think Like a Curator: George Catlin and La Malinche

This activity is designed for high school students for a unit on the Spanish Conquest of Mexico and Michael Wood's Conquistadors.

After working with primary sources from the point of view of Mexicas when the Spaniards first arrived in Mexico (from First Encounters: Native Voices on the Coming of Europeans edited by Howard B. Leavitt (2010)) and Bartolome de Las Casas' "Brief Account of the Devastation of the Indies" (1552), students will curate their own gallery comprised of Catlin's depictions of white Europeans, Native Americans, and American landscapes and various artists' depictions of Hernan Cortes' translator La Malinche.

Students will engage with the questions about Malinche that have survived to modern-day Mexico: was she a victim of conquest, or a traitor who aided in the destruction of the Aztec culture? Students will also explore poems from Gloria Anzaldua's Borderlands in considering the dual identity of Malinche and of the Native Americans depicted in Catlin's paintings.

The "Think Like a Curator" technique will guide students to place the artwork into categories, develop names for those categories, think about the order in which a museum visitor should encounter the artworks, what they would name the exhibit overall, etc. In this way, students will write their own story of La Malinche - do they want their museum visitors to walk away seeing her as a victim, or as a traitor?

Following the gallery creation, students will work individually to write a paragraph using the Claim/Support/Question thinking routine in response to one of the La Malinche paintings. Students will then share their paragraphs in small groups. This extension activity will allow students to further engage with La Malinche’s legacy after exploring different visual interpretations of her.

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Rebecca Marks
40
 

Using Art to Understand Reconstruction

This lesson is designed for a middle school (7th grade) US History lesson on Reconstruction. It is aligned with Virginia SOL USII.3B. The teacher will use Visual Thinking Strategies to help students interpret Winslow Homer's "Visit from the Old Mistress" and create more interest in the personal side of this time period. Then, students will work in partners to read a text and complete interactive notes on terms and ideas from Reconstruction. Finally, the class will come back together to use Harvard Project Zero's Visible Thinking Routines to modify their understanding of the painting based on what they have learned from the reading passage. #SAAMteach
Michelle Moses
7
 

Creating Our Footprint: Art and the Environment

Senior English: Great Outdoors Unit

Objectives: Students will do a close reading of Samuel Colman's Storm King on the Hudson and analyze the elements present in the artwork, in order to come to a conclusion about its major themes. These major themes will then form an introduction to the 10-week Great Outdoors Unit we will be studying.

Additional activities in this unit:

--A close reading of the introduction to Rachel Carson's Silent Spring;

--One artwork analysis technique to discuss Alexis Rockman's Manifest Destiny

--A different artwork analysis technique to discuss/compare "A General View of the Falls of Niagara" and "Niagara Power Plant" (make local connection) OR "The Rouge: Detroit, MI" and Automotive Industry

--Socratic Seminar to discuss, analyze & conclude ideas from the above.

--Common Core assessment: Synthesis essay which uses ideas from both literary texts and 2 different art forms (mural/painting, photography) to illustrate a central idea about the effect of industrialization on the natural world.

--Multi-genre study: Discuss 1) Midway film trailer, 2) TED Talk by Captain Charles Moore "Seas of Plastic" on the Great Garbage Patch and 3) recycled ocean trash sculptures from the Washed Ashore Project by Angela Hazeltine Pozzi. Conclude with a research-based speech/Student TED Talk on issues facing the ocean environment.

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Cheryl Donovan
20
 

Manifest Destiny

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Emma Cisneros
4
 

The Reconstruction, Art, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Title: Reconstructing African-American Roles in Post-Civil War America.
Subject: American Literature
9-12 grades
Objectives: Using close reading of texts, themes, tying art to literature, students will consider the impact of Reconstruction on African-Americans in post-Civil War America.
Resources: art in this collection; student copies of Huck Finn; Fishkin article (in collection)
Methodology : CLAIM / SUPPORT / QUESTION METHODOLOGY (see collection)
I USED TO THINK / BUT NOW I THINK; THINK/PAIR/SHARE

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Cynthia Storrs
7
 

Lawrence's The Library and Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird

This collection has a lesson plan to connect Jacob Lawrence's painting The Library with Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird. Students will connect Scout's love of reading with their own interests using Think, Pair, Share. They will explore the painting using Visual Thinking Strategies. They will discuss empathy in the context of the novel and use Perceive, Know, Care About to write from the perspective of someone in the painting. Pdfs of the strategies and the lesson plan are included.

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Jennifer Bates
5
 

Tenement Lesson Concept

The purpose of this lesson is to examine tenement housing in London and New York City during the Industrial Revolution, and California during the Great Depression. The lesson will begin with a teacher led discussion/evaluation of an artwork by Millard Sheets, Tenement Flats, in which the "Claim, Support, Question" method will be utilized. Next, students will break into groups to analyze additional artwork and photographs to continue examining tenement life. They will access their assigned work and sources through Learninglab.si.edu. They will also Close Read a primary source that provides further information on the era. In small groups they will create a poster size Claim/Support/Question chart that will later be presented to their peers. The class will engage in the "Ladder of Feedback" strategy to analyze and evaluate each others work. The culminating activity will be a low-stakes writing assessment in which groups will open and share a Google Doc to write a thesis, three supporting claims followed by bulleted evidence. Each group will post their final product on Google Classroom. For homework, each individual student will be asked to read and review at least three groups' thesis/claims and post a minimum of two responses providing feedback to their peers. #SAAMteach
Ann Campbell
7
 

The Seeing Eye: Using Edward Hopper's CAPE COD MORNING as Inspiration for Creative Writing

Objective: To examine art and poetry in an effort to see beyond the ordinary, using observation, collaboration, analysis, and inference. To create an original short story and corresponding visual text based on evidence presented in Edward Hopper’s "Cape Cod Morning." // Art is integrated into this lesson in two distinct ways: with the student as consumer AND as producer. By engaging deeply in the artwork and creating multiple artistic responses to it, students truly experience not only the genius of established masters, but the relevance of their own ideas. Benefits beyond the usual curricular outcomes include building cultural literacy and gaining confidence in "reading" art. #SAAMteach

The idea for this lesson came from an article on the Smithsonian website by Helen Appleton Read, in which the author praises Edward Hopper's "seeing eye," which is to say, his uncanny ability to create extraordinary art from mundane subject matter. The students will begin with a close look at "Cape Cod Morning," followed by a structured discussion and analysis of it. After reading Read's article, the students will explore the Seeing Eye as a literary concept by delving into the exquisite Robert Frost poem, "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening." Throughout the lesson, students will practice visual thinking in reading and writing and go on to create both an original short story and a picture inspired by Edward Hopper's "Cape Cod Morning."
Kristen Hill
10
 

What do Americans Look Like?

The concept of racial identity and stereotypes is explored through art from different periods in U.S. history. Students explore the question of "What do Americans look like?" The aim of the activity is to demonstrate how early perceptions of American identity have become deeply embedded in the American psyche, and have resulted in racial tensions and conflict that continue to affect our country today. #SAAMteach
Ellen Fisher
16
 

Manifest Destiny

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Lisa Major
5
 

Black Boy

Artworks to be used to with Black Boy, by Richard Wright, his autobiography which chronicles his search for identity while growing up in the Jim Crow South.

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Joseph Crumb
8
 

Changing Places and Never Let Me Go

Hey Guys!

I know you are so excited to be back at school and thrilled to be in AP Language.  

Here is your challenge for the day.  

1. You are going to look at a series of photos today taken at the same location over multiple years. The photos are in chronological order.  Take your time to look at each photo carefully to spot the changes that you see.  Look at each photo individually and then look at the series as a whole. At the end of the series, I will ask you some questions about what you saw.  You will have 20 minutes to complete this assignment.  Be prepared to share with your neighbors some of what you experienced.

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Michelle Fortier
9
 

Projecting a Message through Portraits

Examine your portrait with your partner.  Answer the three questions in your writer's notebook, being sure to write the portrait's name and artist in your notebook for reference!  What OBSERVATIONS have you made?  What INFERENCES have you made?  

Be prepared to courageously share your findings with your classmates!

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Michelle Streed
15
 

We the People: a Deeper Understanding of the Preamble of the U.S. Constitution

This lesson works best for 8th grade U.S. History, after students have learned how the original plan for government (the Articles of Confederation) was failing the newly independent America and how the state delegates met in the summer of 1787 to correct these failings and ended up writing a new Constitution. 

Students start by using the VTS thinking routine to examine Preamble by Mike Wilkins, an engaging and accessible way to 'read' the Preamble of the U.S. Constitution.  

After 'decoding' the words and noticing all the details they can, students use a handout to analyze the language of the actual Preamble and discuss word choice and intended meaning (they might also look at the photo of the actual Constitution at this point to compare the original with Mike WIlkins' work).  

They then read and analyze 4 quotes from The Federalist Papers defending the Constitution to the states who were about to vote to ratify it as a jumping off point to discuss what the Constitution was meant to achieve for the newly formed states.  Discussion about reasons why states would not want to join this union will also add to the understanding of what was at stake for each state. In addition, looking at a graphic organizer showing state and federal powers under this plan for government will help students see how this system divides power between the states and the national government.

Students then return to the original artwork, and decide if analysis of the meaning of the Preamble and the ideals of the Constitution affect how students 'see' the artwork. Using the 'connect/extend/challenge' visual routine, teachers can record what the students connected to, what new ideas pushed their thinking in different directions, and what is still challenging or confusing about the artwork or the Preamble.  

Some possible extension ideas are included in the collection to highlight the differences between the states as well as their similarities/unity, such as creating another artwork using an excerpt from the Declaration of Independence (while adhering to state DMV rules for vanity plates), and  comparing front pages of different states' daily newspapers. #SAAMteach

Aileen Albertson
9
 

"Cape Cod Morning": A Study in Perspective and Mood in Art and Literature

This collection represents a series of lessons associated with a set of three Hopper Paintings


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Kathleen Dollard
8
 

​Native Americans and Manifest Destiny

A collection of images focusing on the Native Americans and their vanishing cultures due to Manifest Destiny.

Lesson Concept

Travis Meserve

Bowling Green High School, Bowling Green, KY

Grade levels: 9-12

11th grade American Literature Focus for English Second Language Learners

Lesson Time: 50 minutes

Procedure:

1.  Show the students a copy of the painting “Westward the Course of Empire Makes Its Way” by Emanuel Leutze (1861). Ask the students to spend a few moments observing the work in silence, noticing any details that draw their eyes.  Ask the students to let their eyes touch every part of the canvas/picture.

2. Using the teaching strategy “See Think Wonder” ask the students to volunteer details in the work that they see.  Ask them to describe only what they observe in the work (e.g. “I see a man in a fur hat holding a gun”). After the student makes a factual observation, ask the student “What do you see that makes you say that?” if the student says something that is not immediately obvious (e.g. the student sees a wooden sailing ship trapped in sea ice but describes it as a cabin).  Do not correct the student.  Let other students make observations and possibly correct each other through observation and discussion.  After the student is satisfied with an observation, follow up with the question “What do you think about that?” Allow the student to offer any interpretations of what the detail means for the content of the work, the tone, the theme etc.  Avoiding any value judgements, summarize back to the student his or her interpretation and evidential observations supplying any vocabulary the student might lack, asking for the student’s approval of the final summary. Continue this procedure until the students exhaust their observations or the class time restraints are reached.  Finally, follow up with the question “What does this work (or specific observation) make you wonder about?”

3. At this point, ask the students to note anything that they do not see but would expect to be represented in the scene.  Second Language Learners who have been in the USA for 2-3 years would probably have some general ideas about the history of the USA and may be able to offer such absences.  If not, the teacher may need to point out that no Native Americans appear in the main scene.  If the students do not notice the border of the work, point out that there are small scenes in the border that add content/connections to the main scene. Point out that two Native Americans appear there, small and crawling.

4. Ask the students to make a journal entry writing their thoughts about the work, specifically noting the Americans who are represented as moving across the land and the Americans who are not represented.

Extensions:

  1. If the students have enough command of the language, the teacher can discuss representing fact versus propaganda.  Discuss the painting as advertisement for the movement west despite its factual inaccuracies (e.g. the painting depicts California as visible from the Rocky Mountains although it is actually 1,200 miles away).  Contrast this with a handbill distributed in the Dust Bowl areas advertising workers needed in California to pick crops (in reality the number of workers was greater than the jobs available). A possible literary connection could be to The Grapes of Wrath.

  2. Use the painting periodically through the course of American Literature.  Students’ reactions to the work may evolve as they expand their ideas of American history, manifest destiny, and the immigrant experience.  Allow students to write new journal entries each time they revisit the work with new knowledge.  Discuss the dialogue that gets created between the artist, the work, and the viewer based on what the viewer brings to the experience.

Purpose

Objective: The student will be able to make a factual observation about the painting and offer interpretation (where possible) citing evidence from the work.

Follow-up lessons: On subsequent viewing of the work, the student will be able to identify themes in the painting that connect to texts from American Literature (e.g. attitude toward nature, the west, immigration, manifest destiny, etc.)

Rationale for using this artwork: The painting by Leutze encapsulates many themes that permeate American Literature and lends itself to an introduction to the course as well as an anchor for the course that will bear repeated viewing.

Rationale for the the methodology: The English as a Second Language student often does not bring a lot of background knowledge about American history or art.  The See-Think-Wonder technique allows the student to engage with the work as an expert would: one who makes observations and interpretations that allow claims backed by evidence.

Skills:

Differentiating Observation (fact) from Interpretation (opinion).

Making claims based on evidence.

Practice speaking in front of peers using the target language of English.

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Travis Meserve
28
 

Gender Inequality and Identity: Childe Hassam's Tanagra (The Builders, New York) 1918

This collection includes a multi-day lesson plan built around Childe Hassam's Tanagra (The Builders, New York), 1918, and is designed to explore the effect that gender inequality can have on identity. Lessons are designed for an eleventh-grade, American Studies, Humanities-style course, and the historical context is the Gilded Age and the Women's Suffrage Movement. The plan for this mini-unit includes the analysis of visual, literary, and historical texts, and while it has a historical context, the goal is also to make connections to American life today. The essential question for this mini-unit is this: How can unfair gender norms affect what it feels like to be a human being? Included, you will find a lesson plan as well as digital versions of the artistic, literary, and historical texts needed to execute that plan. #SAAMteach

William Connell
21
 

Arguments to meditate: an introduction through American Art

This collection is for use with an introductory lesson for a 12th-grade rhetoric course's unit on "arguments to meditate," which are defined in the text "Everything's an Argument" by Andrea Lunsford and John Ruszkiewicz as, to paraphrase, those arguments which are abstract and/or which lack a clear, explicitly stated thesis and that therefore depend on thoughtful meditation by the audience to arrive at an understanding of the rhetorician's intent. The purpose of this lesson is to (1) establish students' understanding of the definition of an argument to meditate and (2) provide students with a beginning ability to assess the thesis and supporting ideas that comprise arguments to meditate in the form of American Art. The details of the lesson itself are included in a document within the collection.

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Marshall Harris
10
 

The Coal Mining Industry: Art and Poetry

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Jennifer McElroy
5
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