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Found 38 Collections

 

Household Machines: I See Wonder

I See Wonder is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use I See Wonder as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Share what you See. Awaken your Wonder.

Smithsonian Libraries
10
 

See Think Wonder: Images of Girls

How can we think about gender through cultural and social lenses? This image gallery invites students to explore gender identity. Using artful looking techniques, students can think critically about how girls are depicted around the world. This collection uses the Harvard Project Zero Visible Thinking routine, "See Think Wonder" for exploring works of art. This strategy encourages students to make careful observations and thoughtful interpretations. It helps stimulate curiosity and sets the stage for inquiry. 

Keywords: girl, woman, gender, identity, culture, history, advertisements, sculpture, art, anthropology

sheishistoric
24
 

The House on Mango Street pre-reading

A two-day lesson for middle schoolers to introduce some of the themes in The House on Mango Street through art representing Latino/a Americans in the 1900s.

tags: immigrant experience, culture, gender roles, women, class divide, jigsaw, see think wonder

#SAAMteach

Kim Clifton
11
 

​Native Americans and Manifest Destiny

A collection of images focusing on the Native Americans and their vanishing cultures due to Manifest Destiny.

Lesson Concept

Travis Meserve

Bowling Green High School, Bowling Green, KY

Grade levels: 9-12

11th grade American Literature Focus for English Second Language Learners

Lesson Time: 50 minutes

Procedure:

1.  Show the students a copy of the painting “Westward the Course of Empire Makes Its Way” by Emanuel Leutze (1861). Ask the students to spend a few moments observing the work in silence, noticing any details that draw their eyes.  Ask the students to let their eyes touch every part of the canvas/picture.

2. Using the teaching strategy “See Think Wonder” ask the students to volunteer details in the work that they see.  Ask them to describe only what they observe in the work (e.g. “I see a man in a fur hat holding a gun”). After the student makes a factual observation, ask the student “What do you see that makes you say that?” if the student says something that is not immediately obvious (e.g. the student sees a wooden sailing ship trapped in sea ice but describes it as a cabin).  Do not correct the student.  Let other students make observations and possibly correct each other through observation and discussion.  After the student is satisfied with an observation, follow up with the question “What do you think about that?” Allow the student to offer any interpretations of what the detail means for the content of the work, the tone, the theme etc.  Avoiding any value judgements, summarize back to the student his or her interpretation and evidential observations supplying any vocabulary the student might lack, asking for the student’s approval of the final summary. Continue this procedure until the students exhaust their observations or the class time restraints are reached.  Finally, follow up with the question “What does this work (or specific observation) make you wonder about?”

3. At this point, ask the students to note anything that they do not see but would expect to be represented in the scene.  Second Language Learners who have been in the USA for 2-3 years would probably have some general ideas about the history of the USA and may be able to offer such absences.  If not, the teacher may need to point out that no Native Americans appear in the main scene.  If the students do not notice the border of the work, point out that there are small scenes in the border that add content/connections to the main scene. Point out that two Native Americans appear there, small and crawling.

4. Ask the students to make a journal entry writing their thoughts about the work, specifically noting the Americans who are represented as moving across the land and the Americans who are not represented.

Extensions:

  1. If the students have enough command of the language, the teacher can discuss representing fact versus propaganda.  Discuss the painting as advertisement for the movement west despite its factual inaccuracies (e.g. the painting depicts California as visible from the Rocky Mountains although it is actually 1,200 miles away).  Contrast this with a handbill distributed in the Dust Bowl areas advertising workers needed in California to pick crops (in reality the number of workers was greater than the jobs available). A possible literary connection could be to The Grapes of Wrath.

  2. Use the painting periodically through the course of American Literature.  Students’ reactions to the work may evolve as they expand their ideas of American history, manifest destiny, and the immigrant experience.  Allow students to write new journal entries each time they revisit the work with new knowledge.  Discuss the dialogue that gets created between the artist, the work, and the viewer based on what the viewer brings to the experience.

Purpose

Objective: The student will be able to make a factual observation about the painting and offer interpretation (where possible) citing evidence from the work.

Follow-up lessons: On subsequent viewing of the work, the student will be able to identify themes in the painting that connect to texts from American Literature (e.g. attitude toward nature, the west, immigration, manifest destiny, etc.)

Rationale for using this artwork: The painting by Leutze encapsulates many themes that permeate American Literature and lends itself to an introduction to the course as well as an anchor for the course that will bear repeated viewing.

Rationale for the the methodology: The English as a Second Language student often does not bring a lot of background knowledge about American history or art.  The See-Think-Wonder technique allows the student to engage with the work as an expert would: one who makes observations and interpretations that allow claims backed by evidence.

Skills:

Differentiating Observation (fact) from Interpretation (opinion).

Making claims based on evidence.

Practice speaking in front of peers using the target language of English.

#SAAMteach


Travis Meserve
28
 

Tooker's "The Waiting Room" As a Window Into Theme and Tone

Students will begin by examining Tooker's "The Waiting Room" using the "See/Think/Wonder" methodology. Then, they will examine five poems and argue (using evidence from their chosen poem as well as the painting) which poem is closest in tone and theme to the painting. I've included additional images to further the discussion.

cf.porter
9
 

Artist Edward Biberman: See, Think, Wonder & Compare

Artful thinking routines to explore, critique, compare and contrast  two portraits  by the artist Edward Biberman from the National Portrait Gallery. #npgteach

Greta Schorn
15
 

World War II Propaganda

These pictures will be used to introduce a brief history of World War II before exploring communism with the novel Animal Farm. Students can either do one of the visual thinking strategies See / Think / Wonder or a Perceive / Know / Care About using the piece We Can Do It. The class can then proceed into the background overview of World War II.

As students read Animal Farm and study techniques of propaganda, students can then explore the other posters listed in this learning lab. They can first do the sorting activity to differentiate between the Soviet and American posters followed by the discussion about whether the posters more alike or more similar to each other. Connections to the novel can be made throughout this lesson.


Yolanda Toni
13
 

Saving & Sharing Cultural Traditions

Many modern Native Alaskans share their cultural traditions through dance, textiles, song and art. As you watch each of the three short videos, think about the following questions:

1. What do you see?

2. What do you think about that?

3. What does it make you wonder?

Cathleen Edwards
3
 

Access Series: Animals - Domestic and Wild!

This topical collection of artworks is all about animals—domestic pets, and wild, untamed beasts. Horses, elephants, dinosaurs, zebras, pandas...cats, hogs, frogs, dogs, lions, tigers, and bears; fish and fowl, monkeys that howl - you'll find all of them here. This collections was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials), and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, "Which animals have you seen before and where did you see them? If you could have any one of these animals as a pet, which would you choose and why?" Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.


Tags: Decision Making, Disabilities, Self-Determination, Self-Efficacy, Student Empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program

Debra Ray
278
 

Henry Frick - Two Portraits

In this lesson, students will do a close look at a 1910 double portrait of Henry Frick.  Students should closely examine the portrait using the See-Think-Wonder Learning to Look Strategy.

Students may also use the hotspots to closely examine the portrait and answer the T/F questions about the portrait.

Then, students should watch the video excerpt from the History Channel series The Men Who Built America and decide how this video acts as a portrait of the  turn-of-the-century businessman.

What is the same in the two?

What is different?


To extend the lesson, students may complete the sorting activity.  Have them think about how each image or video portrays the robber barrons.  Is each more negative or positive?Why?


To further extend this lesson, students could also redraw the portrait as a political cartoon from a negative point of view.  They may want to be a resident of Johnstown after the flood or one of the Homestead Strikers.




This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery’s 2017 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

 

TAGS: #NPGteach, portrait, learning to look, National Portrait Gallery


Jessica Illingworth
3
 

Access Series: Fantastic Creatures

This topical collection of artworks is based upon "fantastical things." It was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials); and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, utilizing the "See|Think|Wonder" visible thinking routine. You could also pair the collection with popular young adult fantasy novels, and ancient myths and legends.

Descriptors: Decision Making, Disabilities, Self-Determination, Self-Efficacy, Student Empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
64
 

Access Series: Flying Things

This topical collection of airplanes, hot air balloons, space craft, and other things that fly, was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials). It was used as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program--as pre-museum visit preparation to artifacts that would be found at an airplane museum. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, "If you could fly anywhere, where would you go and what would you do?" Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, all access digital arts program

Tracie Spinale
100
 

Access Series: Places "Real" and "Imagined"

This topical collection of artworks is based upon a wide variety of places and travel spots, both "real" and "imagined." It features castles, mountains, beaches, forests, capital cities, and fantasy movie landscapes. It was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials); and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Students were asked about famous places they have visited or would want to visit, as well as favorite vacation or travel spots. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, "If you could travel anywhere, where would you go, and who would you travel with, etc...?" Use the visible thinking routine "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: Decision Making, Disabilities, Self-Determination, Self-Efficacy, Student Empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
72
 

Access Series: People, Friends, and Family--Together and Alone

This topical collection of people—together in groups with friends or families (mother, father, sister, brother, aunt, uncle, cousin, grandmother, and grandfather); different genders, ages, and ethnicities, and "selfies"—was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials); and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
134
 

Access Series: Nostalgic Popular "Pop" Culture

This inspiration collection of nostalgic popular "pop" culture from the 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000s—super heroes and super villains, Muppets, cartoon characters, Star Wars, Disney and Pixar characters, Transformers, and movies was used for a collage activity and discussion prompt in an informal learning activity, "Me & My World: Personal Ecology/Interest Inventory" with a group of teens with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. Students were asked about their favorite pop culture influences from the past and present. Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for a discussion prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
97
 

Access Series: Animals - Domestic and Wild!

This topical collection of artworks is all about animals—domestic pets, and wild, untamed beasts. Horses, elephants, dinosaurs, zebras, pandas...cats, hogs, frogs, dogs, lions, tigers, and bears; fish and fowl, monkeys that howl - you'll find all of them here. This collections was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials), and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, "Which animals have you seen before and where did you see them? If you could have any one of these animals as a pet, which would you choose and why?" Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.


Tags: Decision Making, Disabilities, Self-Determination, Self-Efficacy, Student Empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
278
 

Access Series: Making Music and Sonic Self-Portraits

This inspiration collection of musical people and music instruments was used for a music-making activity and discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. Students used GarageBand software to create sonic self-portraits. Prior to the activity, teens were asked about their favorite genres of music, including jazz, blues, classical, rock, pop, rap, and R&B. Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the discussion prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
66
 

Visual Connections between Buddhism and Ancient Greece

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "See Think Wonder," this activity investigates the cultural connections between Ancient Greece, Rome, and Gandhara* as seen through a sculpture of the Buddha, created in the 2nd century CE. Buddhist sculptures from Gandhara are significant, not only because they show the extent of Alexander the Great's influence on Asia, but also because they are some of the first human depictions of the Buddha in the history of Buddhist art.

Even without a deep knowledge of the art of this period, students can make visual observations and comparisons that reveal the blending of Asian and Greco-Roman culture in this particular region.

*Gandhara is a region in what is now modern Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Tags: greek; kushan; mathura; india; inquiry strategy; classical; roman; gautama; siddhārtha; siddhartha; shakyamuni; lakshanas; signs of the buddha

Tess Porter
6
 

AP Art History Curriculum Framework: Focus on "Jahangir Preferring a Sufi Shaikh to Kings"

This educational resource is designed especially for teachers and students in Advanced Placement (AP) Art History courses. It focuses on an artwork from the Freer|Sackler collection, Jahangir Preferring a Sufi Shaikh to Kings; one of the 250 works that are featured in the AP Art History curriculum. In particular, this artwork is in Content Area 8 - South, East, and Southeast Asia.

The AP Art History curriculum stresses the investigation of four key areas for each artwork: Form, Function, Content, and Context. This resource will touch on all four areas and can be adapted for use.



Tags: Album, AP, Art History, emperor, India, Jahangir, manuscript, Mughal dynasty, Muslim, portrait, Project Zero, See/Think/Wonder


Background Note to Teachers

India's Mughal emperors, who reigned over a vast and wealthy empire that extended over most of the South Asian subcontinent between the 16th and 19th centuries, were passionate about lavish manuscripts and paintings. Between 1556 and 1657, the greatest Mughal patrons—the emperors Akbar, Jahangir and Shah Jahan—formed grand workshops that brought together and nurtured India's leading painters, calligraphers and illuminators. This resource focuses on just one of the paintings created for Jahangir, but the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery form one of the world's most important repositories of Mughal and Persian painting. To search our collection, refer to http://www.asia.si.edu/collections/edan/default.cf....


Related Standards

  • C3 D2.His.1.6-8 - Analyze connections among events and developments in broader historical contexts.
  • C3 D2.His.2.6-8 - Classify series of historical events and developments as examples of change and/or continuity.
  • C3 D2.His.14.6-8 - Explain multiple causes and effects of events and developments in the past.
  • C3 D2.His.15.6-8 - Evaluate the relative influence of various causes of events and developments in the past.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.7 - Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
  • NAEA | Anchor Standard 7 - Perceive and analyze artistic work.
  • NAEA | Anchor Standard 8 - Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work.
  • NAEA | Anchor Standard 11 - Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural and historical context to deepen understanding.
  • NCHS WH Era 6 | Standard 1B - The student understands the encounters between Europeans and peoples of Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and the Americas in the late 15th and early 16th centuries.
  • NCHS WH Era 6 | Standard 3C - The student understands the rise of the Safavid and Mughal empires.
  • NCHS WH Era 6 | Standard 6A - The student understands major global trends from 1450 to 1770.
  • NCSS 1 : Culture - Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of culture and cultural diversity.
  • NCSS 2 : Time, Continuity, and Change - Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the past and its legacy.
  • NCSS 3 : People, Places, and Environments - Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of people, places, and environments.


Resources

This collection has been compiled from materials available on the Freer|Sackler website. In addition, these resources have been especially useful:

Milo Cleveland Beach, The Imperial Image: Paintings for the Mughal Court. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution, 2012.

Print and online materials related to "Worlds within Worlds: Imperial Paintings from India and Iran," an exhibition held at the Freer|Sackler from July 28 through Sept. 16, 2012.


Freer|Sackler Education
12
 

Student Activities | Exploring Point of View

How do you see the world? What's your point of view? What informs, shapes, and affects it? What does it mean to take on another person's point of view, and why is it important? This Learning Lab activity for students explores global issues, perspectives, and close looking through two artworks by Ahmed Mater, a contemporary Saudi artist. In addition to the two artworks, this collection also includes guiding questions, the gallery guide for the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery exhibition "Symbolic Cities: The Work of Ahmed Mater," and an optional article for high-school students.



Tag: Middle East, Near East, Saudi Arabia, Mecca, Urbanization, Project Zero, Asia Society, See Think Wonder, 3 Ys, point of view

Freer|Sackler Education
5
 

See/Think/Wonder: Progressive Era Women Seek Equal Political Rights (Protest)

Objectives:

Students will use primary sources to understand the ways that women advocated for the right to vote.

Students will Explain actions taken during the Progressive era to expand the right to vote for women.

Essential Question: What do these photographs tell us about the use of protest by the Women's suffrage movement?

Scott Karavlan
6
 

See/Think/Wonder: Progressive Era Women Seek Equal Political Rights (Postcards)

Objectives:

Students will use primary sources to understand the ways that women advocated for the right to vote.

Students will identify what these postcards tell us about the arguments for and against women's suffrage?

Students will Explain actions taken during the Progressive era to expand opportunities for women, including the right to vote.

Scott Karavlan
6
 

See/Think/Wonder: Progressive Era Women Seek Equal Political Rights (Geography)

Objectives:

Students will use primary sources to understand the ways that women advocated for the right to vote.

Students will Explain actions taken during the Progressive era to expand opportunities for women, including the right to vote.

Essential Question: Why was the use of geography a persuasive tactic on the part of the Suffrage movement?

Scott Karavlan
6
 

Jazz and Blues

This collection will look at how jazz and blues developed from the 1920s, to the Great Depression and beyond.

This lesson pairs well with a literature unit on the Great Depression novel No Promises in the Wind. In this story, a young teenage boy who is an improvisational pianist eventually composes and plays music which comes from his experiences of being homeless.

Students will do a whole group See / Think / Wonder on Lily Furedi's Subway. As the discussion revolves around the variety of people in the scene, they may begin to focus on the musician with the violin case who is the figure of the center of the painting.

The discussion can than transfer tot he music of the times. Students will then listen to each of the pieces in the collection while writing down the mood, tone and images that they see in their mind's eye as they listen. (The chart is included). The class can then discuss themes of hope, desperation, loneliness, etc...

Student can then write their own lyrics to their own blues composition and share with the class.




Yolanda Toni
16
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