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Meet the Artist: Tom Uttech

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Tom Uttech’s work is inspired by wide expanses of unspoiled wilderness in his native Wisconsin and neighboring Quetico Provincial Park in Ontario, Canada. Uttech’s paintings, which take their names from various Ojibwe words and phrases, are fantastic imaginings, often populated with hosts of birds and other animals that traverse the landscape in a flurry of natural diversity.

Director's Choice - The Girl I Left Behind Me by Eastman Johnson

Smithsonian American Art Museum
The young woman in this picture called The Girl I Left Behind Me by Eastman Johnson may be the most passionate portrayal in all nineteenth-century American art. It is even more openly romantic than Winslow Homer's pictures of women. Everything about her is animated by an inner intensity. She combines the majesty of a classical statue with the mood of a tragic heroine. Who is she and what inspired Johnson to paint her?

Tunicate Facts!

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Did you know that tunicates are the only organisms that can reverse their blood circulation? Check out this video to find out more interesting facts about these fascinating marine animals! Video narration: Matt Starr Edited by: Rebecca Rissanen Collaborators: Rosana Rocha Rachel Collin Richard Pierce Kerrianne Ryan Students of Tunicate Taxonomy Training courses Bocas del Toro Research Station Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute 2011 For more information about the Bocas del Toro Research Station, go to: http://www.stri.si.edu/Bocas https://www.facebook.com/BocasResearchStation

Heart beat reversal in Tunicates

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Tunicates (Ascidiacea) are incredibly interesting animals. They are the only living organism that can reverse their heart beat, causing blood to flow in different directions at a given time. As for the "why" they do this... well, scientists are still trying to find out! This video was made from footage taken by participants of the 2011 PASI: Advanced Tunicate Biology course. Narration and edited by: Rebecca Rissanen Bocas del Toro Research Station Smithsonian Tropical Reseach Institute Panama 2012

Colorful Tornaria

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
These acorn-worm larvae are known as tornaria. Most of the tornaria we have collected in the plankton in Panama are transparent, but in November we collected a large number of these animals with multi-colored guts. We hope to find out what species they are by sequencing the DNA from these larvae and matching it to sequences from known adults.

A Homage to Georges Méliès

Smithsonian Libraries
In conjunction with our current exhibition, Fantastic Worlds: Science and Fiction, 1780-1910, the Smithsonian Libraries recently held an "indoor recess" event where attendees worked in groups to reproduce scenes from Georges Méliès' "Voyage Dans La Lune." The iconic 1902 silent film follows the fantastic voyage of a group of astronomers from Earth to the Moon and back. Scenes were recreated and shot via stop animation. The accompanying music is "Smithsonian Polka," (1855) composed by W. Bergman and performed by Michael Hendron.

Star Stories: The Never-ending Bear Hunt

National Museum of the American Indian
This animation tells the Iroquois story about three hunters who follow a bear into the sky and become the stars forming the handle of the Big Dipper. It is one of nine traditional Native American stories that are part of the National Museum of the American Indian inaugural exhibition "Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World," which is on view through April 20, 2019.

Star Stories: The Girl and Her Seven Brothers

National Museum of the American Indian
This animation tells an Arikara story of the creation of a sacred landmark on the plains, the Bear' Lodge (Devils Tower), as well as the formation of the Pleiades star cluster. It is one of nine traditional Native American stories that are part of the National Museum of the American Indian inaugural exhibition "Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World," which is on view through April 20, 2019.

Star Stories: Quillwork Girl and Her New Seven Brothers

National Museum of the American Indian
This animation tells a Cheyenne story of how the Big Dipper came to be when a girl and her loyal brothers escape from a bison. It is one of nine traditional Native American stories that are part of the National Museum of the American Indian inaugural exhibition "Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World," which is on view through April 20, 2019.

Star Stories: Poia's Journey

National Museum of the American Indian
This animation tells a Blackfoot story of Poia, the son of a woman and Morning Star. It is one of nine traditional Native American stories that are part of the National Museum of the American Indian inaugural exhibition "Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World," which is on view through April 20, 2019.

Choctaw Days 2013: Storytelling by Tim Tingle 1

National Museum of the American Indian
Tim Tingle tells an audience-participation story about how Rabbit got his short tail. Tim Tingle is an animated character, whose way with words and charisma, combined with his love for the Choctaw culture has made him a premier storyteller throughout the tribe. His passion and research has led to many books which entertain as well as educate. Recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 21, 2013.

Star Stories: The Fox and the Stars

National Museum of the American Indian
This animation tells the Chippewa story describing how a man's pet fox scattered the stars across the sky. It is one of nine traditional Native American stories that are part of the National Museum of the American Indian inaugural exhibition "Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World," which is on view through April 20, 2019.

Cherokee Days 2014: Traditional Dances by the Eastern Band 1

National Museum of the American Indian
In this first group of dances, the Tsa-La-Gi Eastern Band of Cherokee dancers perform traditional animal and social dances, including; the Bear Dance, the Buffalo dance, the Corn Dance, and the Friendship Dance. Jarrett Wildcatt introduces the dances and sings. Recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian Potomac Atrium on April 5, 2014.

Meet Our Scientist: Briana Pobiner, Dietary Detective

National Museum of Natural History
Meet Briana Pobiner -- human origins researcher and educator at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. Briana tells what it's like to be a human evolution expert, why it matters, and how she got here. Digging up early human and animal remains from the field in Africa, performing examination and publishing research about her findings, then enticing and educating the public about the implications are all in a week's work for Dr. Pobiner.

Flesh Eating Beetles at the Smithsonian's Osteology Laboratory

National Museum of Natural History
http://www.mnh.si.edu/ At the Smithsonian Natural History Museum in Washington D.C., John J. Ososky prepares animal specimens for research and exhibition with the help of flesh eating beetles. For more info, see: http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/aroundthemall/2009/05/why-are-museum-specimens-bugged/ and http://vertebrates.si.edu/mammals/mammals_staff_pages/ososky_john.cfm

DNA barcoding and metabarcoding reveal diversity in cryptic benthic communities

National Museum of Natural History
Matthieu Leray discusses how DNA metabarcoding can help identify species in coastal ecosystems. Using ARMS (Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures), he was able to compare the diversity of animals in oyster reefs off of the coasts of Virginia and Florida.

Skin & Bones - Meet the Scientist: Spencer Fullerton Baird

National Museum of Natural History
Spencer Fullerton Baird (1823-1887) was the Smithsonian's first curator. He thought it was important to collect and study specimens before species disappeared, being the force behind the Smithsonian becoming the Nation’s Museum. This video is one of a series taken from the mobile app Skin & Bones. The app brings animal skeletons to life through 3D imagery in the Bone Hall at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Download on the App Store and enjoy the videos and 3D experience at the Museum or wherever you are.

Cephalopod video: Stauroteuthis syrtensis

National Museum of Natural History
JSL II dive 1997. Animal swims into the bottom, then spreads its web From: Vecchione, M. and R.E Young. 1997. Aspects of the functional morphology of cirrate octopods: locomotion and feeding. Vie et Milieu, 47:101-110. Online abstract: http://invertebrates.si.edu/cephs/vy97/vy97.html To see other cephalopod videos: http://collections.si.edu/search/results.htm?fq=online_media_type%3A%22Video+recordings%22&q=&fq=tax_class:%22Cephalopoda%22 [taxonomy:binomial=Stauroteuthis syrtensis]

Tzo'kam perform "The Bone Game Song" at the 1998 Folklife Festival

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Flora Wallace and her family--collectively known as Tzo'kam--perform "The Bone Game Song" at the 1998 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Bone games are popular among American Indians across the northwestern United States of America, including the Salish peoples to which Tzo'kam belong. During the game, two teams compete to guess where players are hiding carved animal bones. The game is accompanied by exuberant singing, drumming, or rattles. Bone game songs are very lively and fast paced, and are sung with full voices. The players hiding the bones often gesture expressively in time with the music. In earlier times, it was usually men who competed, but nowadays women and youth participate, too. Playing with percussive accompaniment and animated gestures, Tzo'kam continues this tradition. To find more Native American music visit http://www.folkways.si.edu/searchresults.aspx?set=1&sPhrase=american+Indian&sType='phrase' To learn more about Smithsonian Folkways visit: http://www.folkways.si.edu To find out more about the Smithsonian Folklife Festival visit: http://festival.si.edu/ The content and comments posted here are subject to the Smithsonian Institution copyright and privacy policy (/www.si.edu/copyright/). Smithsonian reserves the right in its sole discretion to remove any content at any time.

Designing Media: Hans Rosling with Ola Rosling and Ana Rosling Rönnlund

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
One of 31 video segments featured in 'Designing Media', the new book, DVD and website by Bill Moggridge. More info on 'Designing Media' available at http://www.designing-media.com Hans is a professor of international health in Stockholm, Sweden. He spent two decades studying outbreaks of disease in remote rural areas across Africa. In 2005 he cofounded the Gapminder Foundation with his son and daughter-in-law, who helped him by designing the animated presentations for his lectures. Gapminder is a modern "museum" that helps to make the world understandable using the Internet and animated graphics to communicate statistics and other information about social, economic, and environmental development at local, national, and global levels. Ola and Anna were studying to become artists but were fascinated by the information that Hans was using for his lectures. They taught themselves to design software to convert the statistics into emotionally compelling and enjoyable media presentations. They have won awards by being "humorous, yet deadly serious." Ola and Anna now work at Google, supporting their Trendalyzer software, which Google acquired in 2007. More info on Designing Media available at http://www.designing-media.com

Members of the Cochiti Pueblo perform an Eagle dance at the 2000 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
American Indian Pueblo cultural expressions invoke many animal personas. The eagle is revered as a symbol of wisdom, strength of vision and heart, and higher consciousness. Like other animals, the eagle is honored through a variety of intricately choreographed dances. The dances use sound and movement to tell stories communicating themes common to the human experience: creation, migration and survival, plantings and harvests, births and deaths, the changing of seasons, the movement of constellations. This Eagle Dance, accompanied by drumming, is performed by members of the Cochiti Pueblo from the banks of the Rio Grande River, between Santa Fe and Albuquerque, New Mexico. To find more Native American music visit: http://smithsonianfolkways.org/searchresults.aspx?sPhrase=American%20Indian&sType=cat To learn more about Smithsonian Folkways visit http://www.folkways.si.edu To find out more about the Smithsonian Folklife Festival visit http://festival.si.edu/ The content and comments posted here are subject to the Smithsonian Institution copyright and privacy policy (/www.si.edu/copyright/). Smithsonian reserves the right in its sole discretion to remove any content at any time.

Perspectives: Rina Banerjee - Behind the Scenes

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
PERSPECTIVES: RINA BANERJEE July 13, 2013--June 8, 2014 Sackler Born in India and based in New York City, artist Rina Banerjee (b. 1963) draws on her background as a scientist and her experience as an immigrant. Her richly textured works complicate the role of objects as representations of cultures and invite viewers to share her fascination in materials. By juxtaposing organic and plastic objects—such as combining ornate textiles and animal forms with tourist souvenirs—she concocts fairytale worlds that are both enticing and subtly menacing. Touching on themes of migration and transformation, the installation's lengthy title conveys the sense of a long journey: A World Lost: after the original island, single land mass fractured, after populations migrated, after pollution revealed itself and as cultural locations once separated merged, after the splitting of Adam and Eve, Shiva and Shakti, of race black and white, of culture East and West, after animals diminished, after the seas' corals did exterminate, after this and at last imagine all water evaporated...this after Columbus found it we lost it imagine this. Music: Phase REM by Kellerkind Video by Hutomo Wicaksono

Egyptian mummy CT scan video, Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History

Office of Public Affairs
This 53-second video consists of a series of images taken with a Siemens Somotom CT scanner of a mummy at the Department of Anthropology in the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C. The individual shown here is a male who died at about 40 years of age; a relatively mature age by ancient Egyptian standards. He is believed to have lived in Lower Egypt sometime between the 25-26th Greco-Roman periods, which is between 600 B.C. and about 150 A.D., or roughly between 2,500 and 1,900 years ago. When this mummy was transferred to the Smithsonian from the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia in the late 1950s, it was partially unwrapped, and very little was known about its history or the individual inside. Years later, using 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional CT scans, Natural History Museum anthropologists found that the brain and major organs were removed and rolls of linen filled out the abdominal cavity. This mummification method is evidence of superior embalming, indicating a person of higher status. The CT scanner uses x-rays to produce a series of 2-dimensional image slices which, for this video, were processed and converted into a 3D model. Two different CT filters were used to extract and digitize the physical properties of the mummy—a bone filter to extract images of the mummy's bones and a second filter that imaged the mummy's soft tissues, both inside and out. After the flesh and bone was digitally extracted, the data were imported into a computer program called 3D Studio Max, where virtual cameras were set up, an animation path was assigned and an animated clipping plane was set up to visually "grow" the mummy. This and other CT scan images of human and animal mummies will be featured on a Website accompanying "Eternal Life in Ancient Egypt," a new exhibition opening at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History on Nov. 17, 2011. The exhibition will explore ancient Egyptian life, religious beliefs and examines how the burial practices serve as windows into ancient cultures and reveal how archaeologists and physical anthropologists gain these insights through their research. This video was made possible by Meg Rivers in the Exhibition Department and Dr. Dave Hunt in the Anthropology Department at the Natural History Museum and Adam Metallo and Vincent Rossi of the Smithsonian's Digitization Program Office.

With Notebook In Hand ca. 1959

Human Studies Film Archives
title from credits (published work)--archival collection

supplementary materials: production notebooks; research materials; technical writings; screening logs; amateur cinema newsletters, awards and programs; and still photographs.

Edited film is the story of the Kreznar family vacation to Florida created by Frank Kreznar, an award winning amateur filmmaker and engineer. The youngest daughter is instructed by a teacher to keep a notebook of her experiences in Florida which include visiting a Florida visitor center, setting up camp in a park, watching a water skiing performance, visiting a marine animal park where they watch a dolphin show, touring the Everglades on an air powered boat, riding on a glass bottom boat, viewing bird and animal wildlife and swimming at a beach. Sound is the daughter's narration of their experiences.
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