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Heart beat reversal in Tunicates

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Tunicates (Ascidiacea) are incredibly interesting animals. They are the only living organism that can reverse their heart beat, causing blood to flow in different directions at a given time. As for the "why" they do this... well, scientists are still trying to find out! This video was made from footage taken by participants of the 2011 PASI: Advanced Tunicate Biology course. Narration and edited by: Rebecca Rissanen Bocas del Toro Research Station Smithsonian Tropical Reseach Institute Panama 2012

Star Stories: Poia's Journey

National Museum of the American Indian
This animation tells a Blackfoot story of Poia, the son of a woman and Morning Star. It is one of nine traditional Native American stories that are part of the National Museum of the American Indian inaugural exhibition "Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World," which is on view through April 20, 2019.

Cherokee Days 2014: Traditional Dances by the Eastern Band 1

National Museum of the American Indian
In this first group of dances, the Tsa-La-Gi Eastern Band of Cherokee dancers perform traditional animal and social dances, including; the Bear Dance, the Buffalo dance, the Corn Dance, and the Friendship Dance. Jarrett Wildcatt introduces the dances and sings. Recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian Potomac Atrium on April 5, 2014.

Star Stories: The Younger Sister

National Museum of the American Indian
This animation tells the Cree story of two sisters and shows that impulsive choices can lead to surprising results. It is one of nine traditional Native American stories that are part of the National Museum of the American Indian inaugural exhibition "Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World," which is on view through April 20, 2019.

DNA barcoding and metabarcoding reveal diversity in cryptic benthic communities

National Museum of Natural History
Matthieu Leray discusses how DNA metabarcoding can help identify species in coastal ecosystems. Using ARMS (Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures), he was able to compare the diversity of animals in oyster reefs off of the coasts of Virginia and Florida.

Flesh Eating Beetles at the Smithsonian's Osteology Laboratory

National Museum of Natural History
http://www.mnh.si.edu/ At the Smithsonian Natural History Museum in Washington D.C., John J. Ososky prepares animal specimens for research and exhibition with the help of flesh eating beetles. For more info, see: http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/aroundthemall/2009/05/why-are-museum-specimens-bugged/ and http://vertebrates.si.edu/mammals/mammals_staff_pages/ososky_john.cfm

Skin & Bones - Meet the Scientist: Helen James

National Museum of Natural History
Helen James is a Curator in the Division of Birds at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Helen is an adventurer who explores Hawaiian caves in search for fossil birds. This video is one of a series taken from the mobile app Skin & Bones. The app brings animal skeletons to life through 3D imagery in the Bone Hall at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Download on the App Store and enjoy the videos and 3D experience at the Museum or wherever you are.

Boxing Rats (Proechimys sp.)

National Museum of Natural History
http://www.mnh.si.edu/ In September 1993, two female spiny rats (Proechimys sp.) were seen boxing along a lake's edge in the western Amazon of eastern Perú. These common, nocturnal animals were seen punching, grabbing, pushing and shoving one another for approximately 10 minutes without any interuptions. (Reference: Wilkinson, F. A. 2002. An Aggressive Interaction Between Two Female Proechimys sp. sp. (Rodentia: Echimyidae). Vida Silvestre Neotropical 11:1-2)

Cephalopod video: Stauroteuthis syrtensis

National Museum of Natural History
JSL II dive 1997. Animal swims into the bottom, then spreads its web From: Vecchione, M. and R.E Young. 1997. Aspects of the functional morphology of cirrate octopods: locomotion and feeding. Vie et Milieu, 47:101-110. Online abstract: http://invertebrates.si.edu/cephs/vy97/vy97.html To see other cephalopod videos: http://collections.si.edu/search/results.htm?fq=online_media_type%3A%22Video+recordings%22&q=&fq=tax_class:%22Cephalopoda%22 [taxonomy:binomial=Stauroteuthis syrtensis]

Skin & Bones - Meet the Scientist: Spencer Fullerton Baird

National Museum of Natural History
Spencer Fullerton Baird (1823-1887) was the Smithsonian's first curator. He thought it was important to collect and study specimens before species disappeared, being the force behind the Smithsonian becoming the Nation’s Museum. This video is one of a series taken from the mobile app Skin & Bones. The app brings animal skeletons to life through 3D imagery in the Bone Hall at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. Download on the App Store and enjoy the videos and 3D experience at the Museum or wherever you are.

Gossamer Worm Life History and Behavior

National Museum of Natural History
How do pelagic polychaetes adapt to their environment? Karen Osborn discusses her research on the morphological adaptations that allow these animals to live up in the water column.

The Singing and the Silence online interview with Tom Uttech (short version)

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Tom Uttech’s work is inspired by wide expanses of unspoiled wilderness in his native Wisconsin and neighboring Quetico Provincial Park in Ontario, Canada. Uttech’s paintings, which take their names from various Ojibwe words and phrases, are fantastic imaginings, often populated with hosts of birds and other animals that traverse the landscape in a flurry of natural diversity.

This Crawling Prehistoric Fish Had Some of the First Limbs

Smithsonian Channel
A flexible neck and powerful jaws helped early shallow-water predators catch prey. But their limb-like fins would propel them beyond their watery environment. From: DAVID ATTENBOROUGH'S RISE OF ANIMALS: TRIUMPH OF THE VERTEBRATES: FROM THE SEAS TO THE SKIES http://bit.ly/1vvsWTv

The Bulldog in the Museum

Smithsonian Channel
Bungie the bulldog was one of the most famous dogs in the world. Until he came to Toronto during a heatwave and died! Now he is one of many animals in the Royal Ontario Museum's taxidermy collection. From: MUSEUM SECRETS REVEALED: Inside the Royal Ontario Museum http://bit.ly/1p32tmO

Meet the Artist: Rachel Berwick

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Rachel Berwick’s sculptural installations investigate ideas of vulnerability and loss in the animal world. Her past projects have explored the extinct Tasmanian Tiger; the Galápagos giant tortoise, Lonesome George; and Martha, the last passenger pigeon. Berwick employs materials such as amber, crystal, and glass to reference natural phenomena and create haunting reminders of what has been—or is nearly—lost.

Choctaw Days 2013: Storytellng by Tim Tingle 2

National Museum of the American Indian
Tim Tingle tells the story of the Choctaw boy named No Name. Tim Tingle is an animated character, whose way with words and charisma, combined with his love for the Choctaw culture has made him a premier storyteller throughout the tribe. His passion and research has led to many books which entertain as well as educate. Recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 21, 2013.

When Did Our Backbones First Appear?

Smithsonian Channel
When did vertebrates emerge, asks David Attenborough? An exciting fossil find in China points to a 525-million year old sea-dweller who used its new backbone to swim nimbly away from predators. From: DAVID ATTENBOROUGH'S RISE OF ANIMALS: TRIUMPH OF THE VERTEBRATES: FROM THE SEAS TO THE SKIES http://bit.ly/1vvsWTv

Star Stories: The Lover Star

National Museum of the American Indian
This animation tells a Chipewyan story of the tragic love between a woman and a wandering star. It is one of nine traditional Native American stories that are part of the National Museum of the American Indian inaugural exhibition "Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World," which is on view through April 20, 2019.

Star Stories: Itcohorucika and His Brothers

National Museum of the American Indian
This animation tells the Ho-Chunk story of jealous brothers and good brothers, who are really stars. It is one of nine traditional Native American stories that are part of the National Museum of the American Indian inaugural exhibition "Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World," which is on view through April 20, 2019.

Star Stories: The Star That Does Not Move

National Museum of the American Indian
This animation tells the Paiute story about the North Star, created by the god Shinh when his goat son Na-gah is trapped after climbing to the top of a mountain. It is one of nine traditional Native American stories that are part of the National Museum of the American Indian inaugural exhibition "Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World," which is on view through April 20, 2019.

Mercury: Exploration of a Planet (Episode 2)

National Air and Space Museum
This film showcases the flight of the Mariner 10 spacecraft to Venus and Mercury. It features views of Mercury, as well as an animation on the origin of the solar system. Dr. Bruce C. Murray, director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, comments on the mission.

This Wild Pig Has Fangs That Can Pierce Its Own Skull

Smithsonian Channel
A male babirusa's canines are an evolutionary mystery: They never stop growing, they're too fragile to hunt or forage with, and, given time, they end up twisting and penetrating the animal's own skull! From: CRAZY MONSTER: Fangs http://bit.ly/2k4zlAP

Hou Yi And The Ten Suns: A Chinese Folktale

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Every year on the fifteenth day of the eighth lunar month, when the full moon is at its roundest, Chinese families gather to celebrate Mid-Autumn Festivities. The full moon symbolizes reunion and completeness. No matter how far apart they may be, family and friends feel connected when they look up at the same moon. Narrated by Karlie Leung Produced and animated by Aurélie Beatley [Catalog No. CFV10637; Copyright 2014 Smithsonian Institution]

Dietary Detective: Smithsonian Scientist Briana Pobiner

Smithsonian Institution
Meet Briana Pobiner -- human origins researcher and educator at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. Briana tells what it's like to be a human evolution expert, why it matters, and how she got here. Digging up early human and animal remains from the field in Africa, performing examination and publishing research about her findings, then enticing and educating the public about the implications are all in a week's work for Dr. Pobiner.
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