Skip to Content

Found 24,894 Resources

Smithsonian Magazine As Art

Smithsonian Magazine

Introducing Smithsonian Magazine on the iPad

Smithsonian Magazine

When reading Smithsonian’s Evotourism package, imagine taking in a high-resolution 360-degree panoramic tour of Kangaroo Island, Australia. Imagine watching footage of the 1980 explosion of Mount St. Helens while reading about the reforestation of the land surrounding the volcano. Imagine learning about the Orchid Olympics and simultaneously perusing dozens of stunning, detailed photos of different orchid species.

For the first time, all this is possible. This week will mark the latest stage in the evolution of Smithsonian in the magazine’s 41-year history: the introduction of the app for the iPad. Alongside the print version, Smithsonian is now offering an enhanced interactive version of the award-winning magazine. “This technology will change the nature of magazines in a fundamental way, while preserving the core experience of a magazine as curated content,” says Bill Allman, chief digital officer at Smithsonian Enterprises. “What’s great about these new tools is that they take a magazine like Smithsonian, in particular, to a whole other dimension.”

The app includes all the feature articles, departments and photography from the print edition, plus a number of app-only special features, like video, extra photos, supplementary interviews and interactive graphics. The entire magazine is viewable in both horizontal and vertical orientations, and has special menus for feature articles, departments and app-only extras.

“The app allows us to tell stories in a multimedia way,” Allman says. “We really have a whole new palette of tools—we can do sound, video, slide shows, interactive graphics, really anything.” Articles include many more photos than in the print version, helping to immerse the reader in the story. “Where you see one picture in the magazine, there might be three on the app that are equally as beautiful,” says Maria Keehan, Smithsonian’s art director.

Watch this video in the original article

Audio and video features are also used to enhance the app. “Some of the things are just flat out fun, like the motorcycle sound at the beginning of the Route 66 story,” Keehan says. “In our cover story on the Haleakala Crater in Hawaii, actually being able to hear a person’s voice—you can watch a video of Clifford Naeole chanting the traditional Hawaiian songs—is so incredible.” The app version of a story on the newly discovered “bark” of the red-bellied piranha includes the actual sound of the piranhas barking.

Interactive elements allow readers to dig more deeply into articles. “In the Evotourism package, for example, the Ashfall Fossil Beds story has a graphic of the fossils lying in the ground, and you can touch each fossil to see a graphic,” Allman says. “In a sense, the reader is now the author of that narrative, because they can go in any direction, and participate in the story in a way they couldn't before.” For “The Mystique of Route 66,” readers can tap on different spots on a map to see photography from each location along the legendary route.

Allman envisions countless possibilities for the future evolution of the app, such as integrating real-time features into articles—like Twitter feeds of figures in the story, updated continuously even months after the issue was published—or added customizable options, such as allowing readers to create their own archive of favorite articles. “This is a new way of storytelling that has heretofore been unavailable to us,” he says. “It’s as big of a shift as it was going from black-and-white to color.”

Smithsonian magazine 5th Annual Photo Contest Winners Jigsaw Puzzle

Smithsonian Magazine

Once the puzzle has loaded, you can choose between the Grand Prize winner, the five category winners along with the Readers' Choice winner by selecting the image from the list then clicking Load/Restart. If you get stuck, select a puzzle piece, click the Hint button and a piece it connects to will flash. Enjoy!

Smithsonian magazine 7th Annual Photo Contest Winners Jigsaw Puzzle

Smithsonian Magazine

Once the puzzle has loaded, you can choose between the Grand Prize winner, the five category winners along with the Readers' Choice winner by selecting the image from the list then clicking Load/Restart. If you get stuck, select a puzzle piece, click the Hint button and a piece it connects to will flash. Enjoy!

Smithsonian magazine 6th Annual Photo Contest Winners Jigsaw Puzzle

Smithsonian Magazine

Once the puzzle has loaded, you can choose between the Grand Prize winner, the five category winners along with the Readers' Choice winner by selecting the image from the list then clicking Load/Restart. If you get stuck, select a puzzle piece, click the Hint button and a piece it connects to will flash. Enjoy!

You're Invited to Smithsonian Magazine's Museum Day!

Smithsonian Magazine

Free Admission at Participating Venues with Ticket on Saturday, September 24th, 2011.

The Museum Day Ticket provides FREE ADMISSION to one person, plus a guest.

In the spirit of Smithsonian Museums, who offer free admission everyday, Museum Day is an annual event hosted by Smithsonian magazine in which participating museums across the country open their doors to anyone presenting a Museum Day Ticket...for free.

For more information go to http://www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/

Give Peace a Listen with Smithsonian Folkways Magazine

Smithsonian Magazine

The Mbiko Aisa Farmers Group. Photo by Richard Sobol

In the latest issue of Smithsonian Folkways Magazine, Boston-based musicologist Jeffrey Summit begins his essay on the Ugandan coffee cooperative Peace Kawomera with two tragedies: the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and the Boston Marathon bombing of April 15, 2013. Summit recorded the music of Peace Kawomera after the former and returned home in the aftermath of the latter. “In the wake of violence in my own city,” he writes, “I have been revisiting the music of this interfaith cooperative, and reflecting about the power and responsibility of each of us to create a climate of peace in our communities.”

Peace, the theme of the Spring/Summer issue, is of course a timeless ideal, but Summit’s words throw its current timeliness into stark relief. The issue takes an “international approach,” says managing editor Meredith Holmgren, “mak linkages of community peace around the world.”

Pete Seeger performs at a peace rally in New York City, 1965. Photo by Diana Davies, courtesy of the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections

The cover story, “Peace Songs of the 1960s,” brings the theme home to American readers and, in a Smithsonian Folkways first, compiles full versions of cited tracks in an embedded playlist. An essay by historian Ronald Cohen contextualizes these songs, including Bob Dylan’s “I Will Not Go Down Under the Ground” and Barry McGuire’s “Eve of Destruction,” under the specter of nuclear proliferation and the Vietnam War. Also featured is a video interview with legendary folk singer Pete Seeger, whose songs were often made popular by other artists.

Former United Nations official Michael Cassandra discusses Nobel Voices for Disarmament: 1901-2001, a compilation of new and archival spoken-word recordings by notable proponents of peace. Michael Douglas, an Academy Award-winning actor and UN Messenger of Peace, narrates the album, which includes the voices of President Bill Clinton, former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan and Progressive-era activist Jane Addams. The piece is accompanied by a multimedia lesson plan, which Holmgren says will become a recurring feature of the magazine.

In the Recording Spotlight is Peace Kawomera (Delicious Peace), the Fair Trade coffee co-op of Jewish, Christian and Muslim farmers—who happen to be excellent musicians as well. The collaboration, formed in response to 9/11, has proven both economically and artistically fruitful, underscoring the “importance of peace to economic prosperity,” says Holmgren. The article by Jeffrey Summit comes with photographs by Richard Sobol and video of a Peace Kawomera live performance.

This issue also marks the debut of “From the Field,” a Smithsonian Folkways Magazine partnership with the Society for Ethnomusicology which presents recent ethnomusicological field research to a general audience. The first installment, “Carnival of Memory: Songs of Protest and Remembrance in the Andes,” documents the music of Peruvian villages devastated by civil war in the 1980s. “People often seemed more willing to sing about the conflict than they were to talk about it,” writes ethnomusicologist Jonathan Ritter; their music helps them commemorate and come to grips with the violence. A photo slideshow and video recording situate these testimonial songs within the Andean carnival genre of pumpin. For Holmgren, the story exemplifies the difficult task of sustaining peace. “Peace isn’t something that happens,” she says. “It’s a process.”

The Hummingbirds of Huancapi perform at a pumpin song contest in Huancaraylla, Fajardo Province, Ayacucho, Peru. Photo by Jonathan Ritter

The 2014 Smithsonian American Ingenuity Awards

Smithsonian Magazine

Smithsonian magazine, the flagship publication of Smithsonian Media, today announces the third annual American Ingenuity Awards, saluting ten groundbreaking individuals across nine categories including technology, performing and visual arts, natural and physical sciences, education, historical scholarship, social progress and youth achievement. This year’s ceremony, hosted by NPR’s Michel Martin, will be held Thursday, October 16th at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC. The event will be sponsored by BASF Corporation, The Lost Bird Project and Prudential Financial, Inc.

Honorees will be recognized at the awards ceremony, in Smithsonian magazine’s special Ingenuity Awards November issue, and on a microsite on Smithsonian.com. Among this year’s winners is singer-songwriter Rosanne Cash, who will receive the Performing Arts award presented by legendary musician, producer, and famed guitarist T Bone Burnett

Rosanne Cash is scheduled to appear at the 2014 Smithsonian American Ingenuity Awards. (Zach Boyden-Holmes/The Augusta Chronicle)

Washingtonian magazine has described this event as the “Golden Globes of Intellect.”

The 2014 American Ingenuity Awards presenters include:

·       Stephen Hawking, Professor, University of Cambridge, Centre for Mathematical Sciences (beaming in from Across the Atlantic via video)

·       George Pelecanos, crime novelist, writer and producer of HBO’s “The Wire” and “Treme”

·       Daniel Libeskind, Master Plan architect of the World Trade Center, Founder and Principal Architect of Studio Libeskind

·       Steve Case, Chairman and CEO, Revolution LLC & Co-Founder, America Online

·       Beau Willimon, Creator/Showrunner, Netflix’s “House of Cards”

·       Kaya Henderson, Chancellor of Washington, D.C. Public Schools

·       Thomas Insel, Director of the National Institute of Mental Health

·       William Gadsby, Medically Retired U.S. Marine Corporal

The full list of winners will be revealed at the awards gala on October 16th.

Smithsonian magazine’s editorial team has selected an exceptional group of honorees who each embody our mission of increasing knowledge and shaping the world of tomorrow,” said Smithsonian magazine editor-in-chief Michael Caruso. “It is thrilling to be able to bring together this group of extraordinary minds, celebrate their revolutionary work, and share their accomplishments with the world.”

Introduced in 2013, the American Ingenuity Awards is the continuation of Smithsonian’s long tradition of showcasing American innovation. Past honorees have included Elon Musk, CEO & CTO of SpaceX and CEO & Chief Product Architect of Tesla Motors, singer-songwriter St. Vincent, jazz musician Esperanza Spalding, Academy Award Nominated Director Benh Zeitlin (Beasts of the Southern Wild), multi-media artist Doug Aitken, writer Dave Eggers and Mimi Lok of Voice of Witness, and Jack Andraka, the 15-year old high school student who invented a new test for detecting pancreatic cancer.

About Smithsonian Media
Smithsonian Media comprises its flagship publication, Smithsonian magazine, as well as Air & Space, and the Smithsonian Media Digital Network. Smithsonian Media is a division of Smithsonian Enterprises, the revenue-generating business unit of the Smithsonian Institution. The Smithsonian Institution is the world's largest museum and research complex consisting of 19 museums and galleries, the National Zoological Park and nine research facilities. Approximately 30 million people from around the world visit the museums annually.

Ask Smithsonian

Smithsonian Magazine

Smithsonian Highlights

Smithsonian Magazine

National Museum Of American Art

Ansel Adams, A Legacy: Masterworks from the Friends of Photography Collection
(through March 29)
Images by the renowned American photographer (1902-1984) illustrate his point of view as an artist and as an advocate of national environmental stances. See The Artful Lens of Ansel Adams, February 1998.

Renwick Gallery

Reinstallation of the Permanent Collection
Thematic reinstallation showcases works in a variety of craft media.

National Portrait Gallery

George C. Marshall: Soldier of Peace
(through July 12)
Exhibition of paintings, photographs and memorabilia salutes the life and career of American statesman Gen. George C. Marshall.

Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden

George Segal, A Retrospective: Sculptures, Paintings, Drawings
(February 19-May 17)
Show includes key examples of the famed sculptor's signature white-plaster figurative tableaux. See Art that turns life inside out, January 1998.

National Air And Space Museum

Star Wars: The Magic of Myth
(through November 1)
Exhibition commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Star Wars trilogy features original props, models, costumes and artworks. Free timed same-day tickets are available at the museum's ticket desk. Advance tickets are available through ProTix for a service charge of $2.25 per ticket (call: 1-800-529-2440). For general information, call 202-786-2122 (24-hour recording). See Star Wars on the Mall, November 1997.

National Museum Of American History

America's Clothespins
(February 14-June)
Single-case display includes patent models of the inventive little device.

Science in American Life
Permanent show traces advances and discoveries in science over the past 125 years.

Union Station on Capitol Hill]

Mail to the Chief: The Stamp Designs of Franklin Delano Roosevelt
(January 30- July 12)
Postage stamps designed by avid collector FDR track the events that occupied his attention as President.

National Museum Of Natural History

Janet Annenberg Hooker Hall of Geology, Gems and Minerals
New permanent gallery showcases the National Gem Collection and takes visitors from the depths of a copper mine to the far reaches of the Solar System. See Mysterious Pearls, July 1997.

National Zoological Park

Amazonia
Permanent installation recreates a microcosm of the world's largest rain forest and river habitat.

National Museum Of African Art

A Spiral of History: A Carved Tusk from the Loango Coast, Congo
(February 1-April 26)
A 19th-century carved ivory tusk bears scenes depicting historical, ceremonial and anecdotal events.

Freer Gallery Of Art

Japanese Art of the Meiji Era (1868-1912)
(through April 26)
Paintings, drawings, ceramics, lacquer, metalwork and cloisonné from the Meiji era.

Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Twelve Centuries of Japanese Art from the Imperial Collections
(through March 8)
Exhibition features art from the Imperial Household Agency and the Emperor of Japan.

Arts And Industries Building

In Search of Balance: The ArtistScholar
(through March 11)
Artworks by five African-American scholars. Discovery Theater Live theater for young audiences. Call 202-357-1500 (voice or TTY) weekdays, 9 a.m.- 4 p.m.

The Castle-- Information Center

Smithson's Gift
Permanent display tells the story of the British scientist whose bequest founded the Smithsonian.

International Gallery, S. Dillon Ripley Center

The World of Orchids
(through March 8)
Show sponsored by the Smithsonian's Horticulture Services Division and the U.S. Botanic Garden displays orchids from around the world.

Anacostia Museum

Man Made: African American Men in the Quilting Tradition
(through June 23)
Display of traditional and contemporary quilts by African-American men.

Heye Center, National Museum Of The American Indian
[New York City]

Memory and Imagination: The Legacy of Maidu Indian Artist Frank Day
(February 15-May 3)
Exhibition features paintings by the self-taught 20th-century Native American artist.

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
[New York City]

The Jewels of Lalique
(February 3-April 12)
Art Nouveau jewelry and objets d'art by artist-jeweler René Lalique (1860-1945).

Arquitectonica: The Times Square Project
(February 17-May 10)
Exhibition of the work of the Miami-based architectural firm focuses on their vision for a new multiuse complex in Times Square. See Times Square Reborn, February 1998

Smithsonian Highlights

Smithsonian Magazine

National Museum Of African Art

Olowe of Ise: A Yoruba Sculptor to Kings
(March 15-September 7)
African art masterpieces by the early 20th-century Yoruba carver include the museum's high relief "Palace Door."

Freer Gallery Of Art

The Seven Thrones of Jami: A Princely Manuscript from Iran
(through March 29)
Illustrations from a 16th-century Persian mystical poem by Jami.

In the Mountains
(through August 2)
Exhibition explores the depiction of mountains in Chinese art.

Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Sakhi: Friend and Messenger in Rajput Love Paintings
(March 8-July 7)
Paintings created in northern India between the 17th and 19th centuries highlight the role of the sakhi as confidante and messenger in Rajput love paintings.

Poetic Landscapes: Two 17th-Century Chinese Albums
(March 8-July 5)
Display showcases two Ming Dynasty albums: "Eight Views of Xiao-Xiang" and "Landscapes Inspired by Tang Poems" by Liu Yu.

National Air And Space Museum

Star Wars: The Magic of Myth
(through November 1)
Exhibition commemorating the 20th anniverary of the film trilogy features original props, models, costumes and artworks. Free timed same-day tickets are available only at the museum's ticket desk. Advance tickets are available through ProTix for a service charge of $2.25 per ticket (1-800-529-2440). For general information, call 202-786-2122.

Space Race
New permanent display traces the competition in space between the United States and the former Soviet Union.

National Museum Of American History

Ella Fitzgerald: First Lady of Song
(opens March 19)
Exhibition features a sampling of personal artifacts, donated to NMAH last year, that document the famed singer's extraordinary career--costumes, sound recordings, scrapbooks, sheet music, photographs, awards. American Encounters Permanent display focuses on the American Indian, Hispanic and Anglo-American cultures of New Mexico's Upper Rio Grande Valley.

National Postal Museum
[Near Union Station on Capitol Hill]

New Deal Post Office Murals
(March 27-September 8)
Show features 18 mural studies commissioned for U.S. post offices during the 1930s.

National Museum Of Natural History

Janet Annenberg Hooker Hall of Geology, Gems and Minerals
New permanent exhibition showcases the National Gem Collection. Exploring Marine Ecosystems Renovated permanent installation explores a tropical coral reef and a temperate rocky shore reef.

National Zoological Park

Amazonia Science Gallery
Permanent exhibition looks at the work of Smithsonian biologists worldwide.

National Museum Of American Art

Posters American Style
(March 27-August 9)
Exhibition presents poster graphics that reflect the concerns, issues, events and cultural aspects of 20th-century American life.

Ansel Adams, A Legacy: Masterworks from the Friends of Photography Collection
(through March 29)
Images by the renowned American photographer.

Time Out! Sports in Art
(through April 5)
Temporary installation celebrates sports as envisioned by a variety of artists.

Renwick Gallery

Inspiring Reform: Boston's Arts and Crafts Movement
(March 6-July 5)
Show examines Boston's contribution to the Arts and Crafts movement.

National Portrait Gallery

George C. Marshall: Soldier of Peace
(through July 12)
Exhibition of paintings, photographs and memorabilia salutes the life of American statesman Gen. George C. Marshall.

Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden

Directions--Kiki Smith: Night
(March 19-June 21)
New works by the American artist explore the enduring yet fragile systems of the natural world.

George Segal, A Retrospective: Sculptures, Paintings, Drawings
(through May 17)
Show includes key examples of the New York-based sculptor's signature white-plaster figurative tableaux.

Arts And Industries Building

In Search of Balance: The ArtistScholar
(through March 11)
Paintings, sculptures and other works by five African-American scholars.

Discovery Theater Live theater for young audiences. Call 202-357-1500 (voice or TTY) weekdays, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.

The Castle-- Information Center

Smithson's Gift
Permanent exhibit tells the story of the British scientist whose bequest founded the Smithsonian.

Anacostia Museum

Man Made: African American Men and Quilting Traditions
(through June 28)
Display of traditional and contemporary quilts by African-American men.

Heye Center, National Museum Of The American Indian
[New York City]

Memory and Imagination: The Legacy of Maidu Indian Artist Frank Day
(through May 3)
Paintings by the self-taught 20th-century artist.

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
[New York City]

The Jewels of Lalique
(through April 12)
Art Nouveau jewelry and objets d'art by artist-jeweler René Lalique (1860-1945).

Smithsonian Myths

Smithsonian Magazine

Introducing Ask Smithsonian

Smithsonian Magazine

Second City at the Smithsonian

Smithsonian Magazine

Smithsonian Says No to "Lucy"

Smithsonian Magazine
1-24 of 24,894 Resources